Sheep's Head Fishing Blog

 

 

 

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2018

Tue

08

May

2018

Scratching ...

Writing these blogs it's easy to gloss over the bad days, concentrate on the good days and give a sometimes over-optimistic impression of the fishing. There's no disguising though that the last month has been difficult, and after some promising catches in March and April the mullet fishing has gone backwards. Main culprit I'm sure has been the unseasonal weather. Two early heatwaves have come and gone in the UK and the east of Ireland, while West Cork has languished under a blanket of cloud and mist with temperatures struggling to get into the teens of Celsius and some days much colder than that!

My banker early-season spot on the Mizen peninsula has properly let me down this year, with several trips finding the place devoid of mullet. Maybe I was unlucky on the days I chose because, judging by the piles of scales I found on the bank, the otters seemed to have been getting a few. But overall the mullet definitely haven't been in the estuary in anything like the numbers or with the consistency they have been in the previous springtimes I've fished. After several blank trips I did eventually bag one lonely mullet, 3lb 10oz. One plus side of the quiet fishing is that I had plenty of time to clean up the rafts of plastic bottles and other unwanted flotsam that had washed up in the winter storms.

Another plus was that after packing up early most days, I also had plenty of time to recce some new marks. On one of these I found a group of mullet in shallow water in a tiny stream running down to a harbour. The biggest of them were probably about 4lbs.

 

It was too shallow to float-fish conventionally and I didn't have my leger gear with me, so I fished floating crust. That day they didn't start showing any interest till the tide was ebbing and the mullet were gradually dropping back towards the harbour. I missed a couple of takes and blanked.

 

The next day I was back about an hour before high water on a slightly bigger tide. The mullet were there again and today they were straight onto the loose crusts I fed in. They were wary of my hook-bait though. Several times fish came up to the crust and nudged it before turning away ... then one turned back and took the crust as it sank. All hell broke loose in the shallow water, and after a brief but exciting fight I landed a mullet just shy of 3lbs. Unsurprisingly after that there was no sign of its shoal mates so I didn't fish any longer.

I struggled to find mullet near to home, blanking a couple of times from the rocks in Bantry Bay apart from several coalfish about a pound that took the bread baits, perhaps a sign the water is still on the cold side. In the absence of much going on this end, I kept doing the drive down to Rosscarbery to keep the mullet-count ticking over, but even there things were getting difficult.

 

18th April was a miserable grey day with a stiff south-east breeze putting a good lop on and colouring up the water. I fished blind on the leger in a couple of swims but couldn't buy a bite. After four hours I was tired of that and relocated to floatfish the lagoon. It was choppy and murky and I wasn't optimistic, but I had one bite and landed a mullet of 2lb 8oz ...

I was back on the 24th on a smaller tide, and with the water shallower I could see mullet moving in front of the grass by the bridge arch, not huge numbers but plenty enough and I was surprised when after two hours I hadn't had a touch from them. I moved down the west side and endured another hour on tenterhooks with mullet swimming round all my baits without taking. Then for no obvious reason they turned on and I had three bites in half an hour. The first fish came off but I had a brace out just either side of 3lbs. Then they turned off again and that was that!

Into May and on the 3rd I was back at Rosscarbery with Julian. We barely saw a fish and didn't get a bite. Today we were back, mostly on the basis it couldn't get any worse. At least we had some rare West Cork sunshine, but the very neap tide and a strong westerly side-wind made fishing difficult.

We weren't seeing much by way of signs of fish but half an hour into the session, my right hand tip nodded and I sruck into a decent mullet. It gave a good account of itself before Julian could net it, 4lbs on the dot. Much later, off to my right, Julian grabbed his rod as he thought the wind was sliding it out of his rest, and found himself attached to a mullet. It was 2lb 8oz, and I'm glad he'd caught one after fishing hard on a difficult day. 

To my left I had this guy for company much of the session. He seemed to be catching more than we were, but not as big ...

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Wed

11

Apr

2018

Back on the Rocks

It was nice to be out again on Sunday and fishing from the rocky shore of Bantry Bay, though the rocks desperately need a few dry days and some sunshine to dry them off so they're not so treacherously slippy underfoot! This session itself was cut short after by rain after about three hours. The fishing was slow in keeping with the very gradual transition to spring this year; the highlight really was the passage of a small pod of minke whales across the mouth of the cove I was fishing, east on the rising tide and west again as the tide dropped away after high water.

 

Fishingwise, I had a small strap conger on a mackerel head early on, then a few knocks and rattles that came to nothing, then finally a half-decent huss last cast, on a mackerel head again. There'll be better to follow as the water warms up, no doubt.

Then today at another Bantry Bay mark ... it started well enough with a bonus pollack about 4lbs that took a popped-up prawn/mackerel cocktail, then soon after I had another little strap conger. I had another couple of knocks that came to nothing then disappointingly the session fizzled out as the high water slack approached. I was tempted to stay on to see what materialised on the ebb, but it seemed I'd set up on top of a real snag-pit that was costing me a rig nearly every cast so when it started to spot with rain I didn't hang around. Always another day.

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Mon

09

Apr

2018

More Mullet

I've been keeping an eye on some marks further west, but for now there's been little sign of any mullet on them. To get my mullet fix I've been heading back to Rosscarbery, trying to pick the milder days with a gentle southerly breeze to maximise my chances of getting a few fish. The last couple of weeks the tactic seems to have been working.

On 3rd April I had a real peach of a session. I arrived after the morning high tide, a big spring, to find plenty of water, a nice colour in the water and mullet showing occasionally off the west bank. They stayed in the same area right through the session, and fed in short spells throughout giving plenty of interest on the quivertips and plenty of rod-bending action. I finished with seven mullet on the bank of all sizes from a little 1:10 to a best of 5:03, also including three chunky 3s and a 4:04.

And then again today ... it was a smaller tide so I was fishing much shallower water which also much clearer and although not cold, the breeze had a slight edge on it. There were loads of mullet off the west bank again, but they didn't feed at all for the first couple of hours. Then as I tucked into my sandwiches, the mullet came on the feed too and I enjoyed regular if not hectic action for the rest of the session. The bites were more tentative than usual, and three of the mullet I hooked came off. But four hung on, three arounds 3lbs and a handsome looker of 4:08 to finish the session ...

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Fri

16

Mar

2018

Catching Again

February mullet fishing proved difficult and ultimately unsuccessful. I did a first trip to Rosscarbery on the 4th. I couldn't see any sign of mullet and ended up fishing blind in the swim where I'd caught the two fish at the end of January. Incredibly, I missed a decent pull on my very first cast! As I wound in, the thought flitted through my mind that I may have just missed my best chance of a February mullet. And how prophetic that turned out to be, as that session petered out without further interest, and three further blank sessions followed before we headed for the ferry and a long-scheduled UK trip on the 19th. That put an end to any prospect of a mullet in February, though as the Beast from the East and Storm Emma arrived shortly after and dumped a blanket of snow over West Cork, I doubt I'd have been out much anyway.

 

It was frustrating that I'd missed that chance, frustrating also that I'd seen mullet on the other trips, albeit not in big numbers and apparently not feeding. And frustrating that as soon as we were back in Ireland and I was fishing again, the mullet were around in greater numbers and feeding again ... in March!

 

My first trip was on the 8th and there were decent numbers of fish showing out from the west bank when I arrived about lunchtime. I put out the usual two leger lines but I didn't get any definite takes, I thought slightly surprisingly given the fish seemed quite active. Eventually a sizeable group of them gathered in a shallow corner and I decided to break out the float rod. Tackled up again, I waded out a little way, crouched low and put a little Puddlechucker out into the midst of the feeding mullet, fishing a small flake bait just a few inches deep. Still bites were hard to come by, then unexpectedly the float stabbed under and I missed with the strike. But I was better prepared a minute or two later when the float dipped again and I was in ...

 

The fish bow-waved out through the shallow water scattering its shoal mates then put up a decent if uneventful scrap before I could beach it. It weighed 4lb 5oz. The blingy reel is the Shimano Catana that I won in the raffle drawn at the Mullet Club AGM ... it seemed churlish not to give it a whirl and in fairness it did a decent job but I don't really like rear-drags much on fixed-spool reels so it may not get a lot of other outings.

I headed back a few days later on the 11th, a mild but miserable grey day with drizzle and a southerly lop pushing up the estuary. I couldn't see anything moving off the west bank where I could have fished from the lee of the car, but when I walked along the causeway I could see mullet whelming and topping in the shallows in front of the shingle area. This would mean fishing with the weather right in my face, but nothing ventured nothing gained ... it actually turned into quite a good session with regular interest on the tips. The first fish I hooked came off, but then I landed three of 3:09. 3:07 and 4:04. 

The fish moved on as the flood tide pushed into the pool from the left, and since I was happy with what I'd had I called it a day.

 

I was back today, a much brighter day but with a fresh and chilly SE breeze. The water was well up and I couldn't see much sign of mullet anywhere so I decided to fish on the west bank where it felt like spring tucked behind the car with the tail gate up. The mullet must have been feeling it too as despite not seeing much surface activity till the water had dropped away I had a succession of knocks and pulls on the quivertips and I landed a string of five mullet of various sizes between 1:10 and 3:07.

As the new tide pushed into the pool, the mullet seemed to go off the feed and move on. I was already starting to pack up when my left rod yanked right over and a better stamp of fish ran off line. I soon had it under control and worked it closer in to net ... no monster but at 4:01 the best fish of the day.

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Tue

30

Jan

2018

Slow Start (but Worth the Wait)

The storms between Christmas and New Year and on into January made for some difficult fishing.

 

I visited Rosscarbery on the 1st and the 10th of the month without seeing a mullet or getting a bite fishing blind. On the 10th I packed up early and had a good look round several parts of the Clonakilty estuary hoping to find some fish but to no avail there either.

After a couple of better days I was back at Rosscarbery on the 14th.

 

It was calm when I arrived and I could see mullet moving occasionally well out from the grass by the bridge, so I set up there and fished both leger baits as far out as I could cast.

 

From time to time I could see fish in the area of my baits, but they didn't show any interest in feeding on bread. After a while a breeze sprang up so I couldn't really tell if there were any mullet still about, but I fished on till the tide started to rise before deciding on a move onto the west bank which would be more sheltered.

 

To my surprise I saw mullet immediately, and on watching a while there seemed to be three or four small groups of fish moving around. They didn't look any great size - 2lbs tops I thought - but under the circumstances I'd have liked to have caught one. So it was disappointing when a couple of tentative knocks on the tips came to nothing.

 

The closest I came to seeing a mullet on the bank was this bit of otter-kill! The otters do take a few, particularly in winter when their preferred diet of large shore crabs presumably gets a bit scarcer. I enjoy seeing the otters though and don't really begrudge them the odd mullet.

After another stormy interlude I was back on the 20th ... and the mullet had evacuated the estuary again. I really wanted a January mullet but by this stage I'd have settled for anything, so on the 22nd I took the big rods down onto the local pier to see what was about.

 

Even this turned into a struggle, with the edible crab population turned hyperactive by the unusually coloured water. I wound in seven or eight of the things, unfortunately none quite big enough to keep. They were ruining my big fish and squid baits in next to no time but I did get two or three short but very fast runs. In the end I put on a couple of smaller baits to try to find out what was going on, and had a decent coalfish.

By yesterday it was reaching Last Chance Saloon time for a January mullet, and fortunately a couple of calm days were forecast ahead of the next blow. I had a good look round on arriving at Rosscarbery and although they were not plentiful, I could at least see a few mullet topping, mostly in front of the shingle below the N71 causeway.

 

I fetched my kit from the car, jumped down the wall and put my two pop-up crust baits out, one close in and one further out and to my right. I waited fifteen minutes, seeing fish move close to both baits but getting no takes on either, then I wound in the close-in line to rebait. I was just about to cast it again and the right-hand rod pulled round. A quick bit of rod juggling and fish on ...

 

What followed was fifteen minutes of fairly unspectacular fight, the fish neither running out far nor wanting to come in. A few times after I'd recovered a little line it would surge out again, not far but powerfully. I began to feel it was a decent fish, but even so I was surprised when it eventually kited into the shallows and I went to pick it up ... a real lump ... 6lb 12oz.

I was well chuffed with my second largest Irish thicklip, an old warrior that had lost most of its front dorsal fin at some stage of its life.

 

And yes that is calm water and blue sky in the photo ... there's been precious little of either this winter!

 

I fished on for another three hours in that swim but despite having mullet all round my baits from time to time, I couldn't get another take. The fish moved on as the flood tide pushed into the pool. I headed round onto the west bank and as it calmed right off into the evening I could see hundreds of mullet whelming and bow-waving in the middle of the pool ... presumably mostly new arrivals on the tide.

 

Every now and then a few moved into my swim, but I only had a couple of non-commital knocks on the tips. I wasn't unduly surprised, the new sea water that had flooded in felt brassy cold, and the air temperature was plummeting under the clear sky.

Today I was back again. It wasn't such a nice day with persistent drizzle and a bit of a light south-east breeze running up the estuary, rippling the surface. However, in lulls in the breeze I could see mullet moving in the same swim where I'd caught yesterday so I headed back there.

 

The session was similar to most of yesterday's, with fish all over my baits but not taking them. I stayed put though as I thought it was just a matter of time and a couple of hours in, as a particularly active looking group of fish moved through my swim, my left hand tip dropped back.

 

My strike met with satisfying resistance from a somewhat livelier fish than yesterday's. Seven or eight minutes later I drew this handsome 3:15 into the shallows.

 

I fished on another hour and missed a good pull last knockings for that swim as the flood tide pushed the fish out. I was a bit cold and damp so I decided to give it best rather than follow the fish round onto the west bank, and I was happy anyway to have caught my January mullet. That's now eleven consecutive months I've caught, roll on February.

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2017

Sat

23

Dec

2017

More December Mullet

The weather has stayed very mild this week, so today it was back to Rosscarbery for some more winter mullet.

 

On arrival I could see a group of fish grubbing around in very shallow water on the west bank. I fished for them for twenty minutes or so, getting a couple of line bites but no proper takes. Then a couple of cormorants arrived and started harassing the fish, which soon moved on. The cormorants left and I fished on for a few minutes hoping the mullet would reappear, then I decided to move. I was just breaking down my first rod when the other pulled over hard then sprang back before I could pick it up - a missed chance.

Soon I was relocated onto the shingle where I'd had the 5:01 on Monday. There were mullet all along, but they seemed very flighty, whelming and bow-waving out of the shallows if a bird passed over or someone walked along the causeway behind me. Still, I was surprised how little attention my baits were getting, an hour fishing and just a few trembles on the tips.

 

Eventually one of the trembles developed into a good pull-down on the right-hand tip. I struck and a decent fish ran slowly out. It chugged back and forth for a minute or so, then it was gone. It seemed to have cut the trace on some sharp snag.

 

I tied on a new trace and was soon fishing again. A few minutes later my left hand tip dropped back then twitched around, and I struck into a mullet. It was a lively fish but not as big as the one I'd lost ... in fact 2lb 7oz.

I stayed in that swim for another hour, still seeing fish moving, further out now, but not getting any more takes. I walked back to the wall section where I'd had a couple of fish on Monday and put the leger baits out again. I saw a few whelms but I think it was just one or two fish going round ... anyway, no takes there today and another 90 fishless minutes passed.

 

It was shaping up for quite a disappointing session so I decided on another move for the last hour of daylight. I headed back towards the shingle swim but as I crossed over the bridge on the way, I saw a large whelm right in the tail of the outflow from the lagoon. I watched a couple of minutes and saw more whelms. Mind made up, I set up on the grass as close to the bridge as possible and welted both baits out as far as I could into the outflow.

 

A great hour's fishing resulted, really making the day, and tempered only by the thought that I could have moved sooner! Finally the mullet seemed to be feeding well, giving me a series of good solid bites. I had three more out, a little one of 1:15, a 3:06 and a lovely 4:03 to finish right into the dusk.

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Thu

21

Dec

2017

Long Time Coming

Work took up the rest of November, and the first week of December. I finished the last batch of exam scripts just in time for a visit by Keith Gillett, the chairman of the National Mullet Club in UK. 

 

Unfortunately Keith brought some horrible weather with him, a blast of strong northerly winds straight from the Arctic dropping the air temperature close to zero. We fished two long days at Rosscarbery and though I was slightly surprised that we saw a few mullet each day and we did have a couple of half-hearted bites on the first afternoon, ultimately we blanked. The swan population of West Cork seemed to have descended on Rosscarbery and they made a real nuisance of themselves.

 

On Monday this week I was back, this time with Julian. It was flat calm and the water was both low and very clear and although the air temperature was up to about 10 celsius, the water still felt icy cold. There seemed to be plenty of mullet about but they mostly stayed well out in the middle of the pool. The few that strayed into range showed no sign of feeding on our baits, another blank! Most of the swans had moved on but those still present hung around us right through the session, a proper pain. 

 

And so to today. It was overcast with drizzle on and off, but there was a gentle SW breeze putting a ripple on the surface and the air temperature was up to 13 celsius so despite the recent poor form I felt much more confident about the prospects. Another positive, the swan population was down to just two adults and their four nearly-grown cygnets, and happily they left me alone all day!

I had a good look round on arrival and found a big shoal of mullet close in to the shingle beach under the N71 causeway east of the bridge arch. I went back to my car and fetched my tackle, jumped down the wall onto the beach and set up my leger rods a little to the right of the shoal. I fished one bait close in and to my left, about where I judged to edge of the main shoal was, and the other bait further out aimed at the odd fish I could see topping out there.

 

They certainly weren't going mad for bread but I had a couple of knocks which may have been line bites and then after about thirty minutes and a couple of re-casts, a proper take on the close-in bait. The fish ran out strongly but I stopped it without bother before it reached the various snags on the edge of the mudbank offshore. It seemed a good fish and it gave a decent account of itself as I worked it gradually closer towards me. After seven or eight minutes I was able to beach it in the shallows. It was a really nice fish of 5lb 1oz ...

It had the typical pale colouration of the winter fish at Rosscarbery, which I think goes with the shallow clear water; also an unusual clear band on the trailing edge of its tail. I'm not sure what this is about - perhaps it has grown back recently after a fin-rot episode?

 

Unsurprisingly the main shoal of mullet had spooked and moved off while I was playing the fish, but I continued to see occasional whelms and bow waves further out, so I fished on. I had a couple more line bites (the fish spooked as I struck, well short of the bait) but no more takes so after an hour or so I moved on.

 

I could see some fish moving out from the first section of wall down the west side of the estuary, where I'd parked the car. I wasn't sure they'd be feeding any better than the fish I'd just left behind, but I decided to give them a go while I sat in the lee of the car eating my lunch. I'd just finished eating and was about to make a coffee when the left-hand rod pulled over. This rod was fishing well out from the wall, and it took a while to play the fish in even though it wasn't particularly large ... 2lb 9oz. I returned the mullet and re-cast both rods, then settled down to the coffee. I'd just finished drinking it when the right-hand rod kicked a couple of times and I was into another mullet that had taken close in to the wall ... a very lively thicklip of 3lb 7oz.

The swim went very quiet for an hour or so after that, and the drizzle turned into a light rain. I was happy with what I'd caught and decided to call it a day.

 

 

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Sat

04

Nov

2017

Fishing at Christchurch

Ex-Hurricane Ophelia and Storm Brian rattled through in quick succession and the inshore waters around West Cork were thoroughly stirred up. I ventured down to Rosscarbery on 22nd October, just after Brian, and even in the relatively sheltered waters there the mullet had made themselves scarce. It was a six hour blank across two different swims, not a bite and only a couple of fish seen. That was my last chance gone before a trip to the UK spanning two sets of work meetings in Cambridge, more than a fortnight away in all.

 

However, between the meetings I was staying in Christchurch in Dorset with my sister, and late in the season though it was, it just wouldn't have been right not to have a go fishing in the Harbour there.

Sunday 29th October turned out to be something of an unofficial NMC get-together. Pete Bluett & Jenny Kent were up from Cornwall for the weekend, Bob Kitcher and Steve Smith were fishing, Paul Howe & family visited us on the bank and Dave Matthews & Jane joined us in the pub after.

Sadly the mullet didn't turn up in the same strength. The place had been fishing really well up until recently, especially for Paul who'd had a wonderful 8:02 thicklip among a string of other good fish. But Storm Brian, particularly the rainwater in the rivers I suspect, seemed to have dropped the fishing off a cliff and it now all had a distinctly end-of-season feel about it.

 

I had this handsome 4lb 3oz thicklip early on amid a little flurry of bites that also brought two small bass. The rest of the day was attritional to put it mildly with grey skies and a cold northerly breeze. Everyone else blanked with very few bites even.

Thursday 2nd November was even colder though paradoxically rather more pleasant with sunny spells once the morning fog cleared and a lighter breeze, still northerly. 

 

It was another long day for little reward, a scrub fire over on Hengistbury Head providing the main interest.

 

I started in a shallow creek swim and dropped a modest-sized mullet off after a couple of hours. A couple of hours later, with the water rapidly draining away, I held on to another one that pulled the tip of my left hand rod over. It turned out to be a golden grey of 1lb 14oz. It wasn't what I was after but I'm always pleased when a goldie chances along, they are such pretty little fish.

I moved to a swim on the main river channel and did have a few bites over the low water period. They were very rattly though, I thought probably dace or maybe very small mullet. The only fish I landed was a small bass that gave an altogether more violent take. On the first of the flood tide I could see a few mullet whelming and bow-waving up the middle of the river, probably thinlips.

 

I left feeling I could have done better, but it hadn't happened and the fishing had been such a struggle I decided to pass on another opportunity today. I had at least caught a November mullet - that's now mullet every month since March and I hope I'll be able to keep the record up over the winter months in Ireland.

 

 

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Sat

14

Oct

2017

Fishing with Julian

I arrived at Lough Hyne in the half-light early on Monday morning to find the Lough mirror-calm. The place hasn't been on great mullet form this year, and I was disappointed again not to see much sign of activity on the surface. Still, I got the rods out and started feeding a little mashed bread, and soon Julian arrived. Mission: to catch his first mullet.

 

Given there weren't many mullet showing, and maybe it would be a one fish day, I got Julian fishing while I sat next to him slowly feeding the swim. Soon his float dipped away and he struck into ... a mackerel. A few missed bites, then another mackerel!

 

Soon we were seeing an occasional mullet swirl on the surface and Julian was getting, and missing, bites regularly. The mullet we were seeing looked small and in keeping with that the bites weren't particularly positive. Julian wasn't doing a lot wrong, but every miss was increasing the frustration level, and in his frustration he passed the rod to me to show him how to strike. I suppose the outcome was inevitable, one miss on another fiddly bite, then next cast when the float was pulled under much more decisively, I struck into a very decent-looking mullet.

I quickly thrust the rod back into Julian's hands. The mullet put up a good scrap, but Julian played it well, managing to steer it away from the mooring rope stretching through the shallows near where the fish had been hooked until it was in the clear deep water off the front of the pier.

 

A few minutes later and he was able to bring the fish into the net, and I swung it ashore. It was a very long and lean individual but otherwise in cracking condition and over 3lbs of weight.

We fished on. The tide was dropping now and we had stopped seeing mullet on the surface. Julian missed a couple more bites before they dried up completely. 

 

Then, after a lengthy lull, a single mullet started taking bits of floating bread just out of casting range. It looked a good fish from the size of the swirls, and the swirls seemed to be coming closer towards us.

 

Eventually Julian's float sank away and he struck into ... a small goby! The mullet drifted off out of range again.

 

I had to head home and I left Julian fishing, he caught another goby but not a mullet. He'd have to wait till another day to get his first mullet that was all his own work, so to speak.

Today we met at Rosscarbery, and we started off legering from the grass by the bridge again. There were a few fish topping occasionally, but nothing like as many as on our last visit when I'd landed a couple and Julian had lost a couple. After two hours without a bite between us, we decided to move down the west side of the estuary.

 

Now we could see a few mullet moving in the shallow water quite well out, but obviously not feeding well as we remained biteless for another hour.

 

A couple of fish started showing closer in, and Julian dropped his bait about where they were. He was just rearranging his chair when the bite came and I noticed it first, two or three good pulls on his quivertip. I called and Julian grabbed the rod ... the fish was on and stayed on during a decent scrap, and after a few minutes a nice 4lb 13oz thicklip was in the net. One happy angler ...

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Mon

09

Oct

2017

Rock Sessions

Mackerel had only been showing patchily here this summer, but on both sets of springs in September they seemed to be around in force, especially on the Bantry Bay side of the peninsula.

 

I do quite enjoy catching them individually on light tackle, but for now the order of the day was to catch big numbers for some meals and to stock up the bait drawers of the freezer.

 

I've been a long-term fan of the Mustad Ayaka shrimp rig for mackerel fishing, and these were catching well enough, but I had a few sets of TronixPro Sabikis I'd been meaning to try and one of these did finally get a go ... and I must admit they were better fish catchers than the Ayakas. Quality kit though they aren't: at the end of their first session the set of six had lost one hook completely and two others had been reduced to bare hooks. I had in mind to salvage what I could as a set of three, but by the time I got round to it the hooks were all very rusted so I chopped the rig up and consigned it to the bin.

I dipped into the new mackerel freezer stock for the first time for a session on the north side of Sheep's Head. The best part of the flood tide was missed waiting for the rain to stop, and it was nearly high water by the time I was set up on the rocks and fishing.

 

It proved quite a slow session apart from a little flurry of bites about two hours down the ebb. These yielded a couple of small bull huss and a better one, a male fish about 10lbs which gave as good a fight as I've had from a huss. It took a king prawn/mackerel cocktail, popped up as usual.

 

Earlier that week I'd had a discussion about bull huss (among other things) with an angler who stopped for a chat as I was fishing on the roadside at Rosscarbery. He reckoned he used a 40lb mono trace for them, no wire biting piece like I use. He said he'd never been bitten off, lucky guy I think ...

It seems to have been a decent pollack season, and recently among a lot of smaller fish I've had them in the 5lb - 6lb class during several short sessions on rock marks either side of Kilcrohane on the south shore ...

I've dedicated a few other short sessions to try and get on top of the soft plastics for wrasse. I'm still not really there to be honest, in general catching less than I probably would do on natural bait. Some days loads of little pollack have got in the way; others the wrasse just haven't seemed turned on to the method, or at least not to the particular lures I'm using or the ways I'm fishing them.

 

It does appeal to me though that I don't have to spend an hour lifting rocks to collect crabs or decimate the local limpet population. And I've been catching enough to persuade me the soft plastics have merit, so I'll keep at it as and when ...

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Tue

03

Oct

2017

Rosscarbery Mullet Sessions

Three mullet sessions to report on here, all at Rosscarbery which is a great venue to have available when westerly winds write off most of my other mullet marks, as they have all too often recently.

 

On 26th September I had a morning appointment in Cork, so I arrived late lunchtime. It was another dull and blustery day, so I set up the leger rods on the sheltered west side of the estuary pool. There were decent numbers of fish about and I ended up with four on the bank ... 4:06, 2:14, 4:10 and a lovely specimen fish of 5:07 to round the day off nicely.

Later that week on the 29th, I was back again. The wind was really howling today, but I wanted to go to meet my Facebook friend Craig for the first time. I knew he would be fishing at Rosscarbery having taken a detour on his way home to Dublin from a few days away in Kerry.

 

Craig was already fishing from the road in the corner by the hotel, and we had a chat while his rod tips waved in the wind. There were several others set up along the road, I gather mainly refugees from a cancelled boat trip, so after leaving Craig I drove on further down the west side away from the crowd and also in the shelter of the trees. 

 

The water was low and clear, and although I could see a few fish moving they didn't look that interested and I wasn't that hopeful. Two hours passed with one torrential rain squall but without any attention from the mullet. Then a little knock on one of the tips repeated, and I struck ... a 3lb 12oz thicklip. Next cast, I had a much stronger pull, and a much more powerful fight, from another of 4lb 6oz ...

That seemed to be that for that swim ... I fished on another hour without a knock and no longer seeing fish. I had another chat with Craig en route to fish my wading swim by the bridge arch, but it was hard work on the float in the wind and after a fruitless hour I decided to move again, this time into the lagoon.

 

I set up on one of the little piers by the activity centre, the float set to fish about a foot deep which would be just off bottom on this neap tide. I missed good bites on the second and third trots through and then ... nothing. I don't think I bumped the fish on the second strike, but it seemed to have moved on and I fished on another hour without a definite bite, though it was sometimes hard to be sure in the choppy water. Another squall passed through, then a rainbow seemed to promise much ... and a few minutes later my float bobbed then pulled away. I struck and happily the fish ran out this time so there was no repeat of the flagpole incident. After a very good scrap lasting eight or nine minutes, I slid the net under a pristine fish of 4lb 2oz.

Today I was back at Rosscarbery to meet another blow-in from the UK called Julian who wants to get into mullet fishing and contacted me through the website here. We met by the lagoon but couldn't see any movement in there apart from cormorants, so it was good to see plenty of mullet topping in the pool the other side of the road.

 

I'd brought along two rods already set up for legering so we were soon fishing from the grass, putting one out each. Then I started showing Julian how to set up the rig on a third rod. We'd just got as far as the fluorocarbon trace when out of the corner of my eye I saw my rod tip starting to nod, so I grabbed the rod ... nothing much happened, maybe a little slack, I struck anyway and fish on. Then I thrust the rod into Julian's hands! It had been an unusual bite and it was an unusual fight, with the mullet coming in easily then coming to life a bit in the edge. Julian didn't do too much wrong, maybe a bit too gentle if anything, so it was a bit of a surprise when the fish came off after a few minutes.

Julian insisted I take the next fish, which as it happened wasn't very long coming. On my very next cast my rod heeled over in a much more typical Rosscarbery bite. The fish ran out a little way then just hung out there for a good few minutes, before giving up and kiting in quite easily, and Julian netted it first time.

 

It was an absolutely pristine thicklip of 5lb 3oz, so much so that I hesitated more than a few moments before removing five of its scales for the IFI sampling. As Craig said on Facebook, it's for the greater good.

 

We set up fishing again but it had gone very quiet, and a breeze was now rippling the surface making it difficult to tell if we still had any numbers of fish in front of us, though the occasional decent whelm suggested there were still some there.

 

After a while I was in again. Another good bite and a decent but not prolonged fight with a fish of 3:11 ...

Another lengthy spell of inactivity followed, ended by a little knock on Julian's rod that came to nothing, then a slightly better bite a few minutes later.

 

The fish was on ... then off again a few seconds later. It happens in mullet fishing we all know, but I was disappointed for Julian who had to leave shortly after without catching on his debut mullet session. I suspect he won't have to wait too much longer.

 

When Julian left I moved into the lagoon for some floatfishing. I fished a couple of hours and had a few little flurries of bites, but they were very feeble bites and I think very small mullet were responsible ... I couldn't hook one anyway.

 

Then I moved back across the road. The tide was coming up now, the water had coloured up and the breeze had freshened. I spent another couple of hours without a bite on leger, and without even seeing a mullet.

 

 

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Thu

21

Sep

2017

Mullet Update

It's been a slightly frustrating few weeks at what is generally one of the best times of year for mullet fishing. The up and down weather has limited my opportunities, but even when I have got out I seem to have missed the best of the fishing. I've also lost a couple of good fish under unusual circumstances, more of which later.

 

On 4th September I had a short session on the rock mark on the north side of Sheep's Head which had been reasonably consistent when Steve was over, if not hitting the heights of earlier in the summer. There were still mullet in residence, but the size was disappointing. I had three between 1:12 and 1:14, this from a mark where I've rarely had fish under 2lbs before. Pretty little fish though...

On the 5th my friends Pete and Jenny from Cornwall arrived to stay in Rosscarbery. They arrived in time for a short evening session and Pete was straight into the action with a 5:10 and a 5:13, with a similar-sized fish lost. I resisted the temptation to go and visit them on the 6th, instead heading to my estuary on the Mizen peninsula to fish the top of the big spring tide that evening.

 

Standing on the causeway I had a stiff breeze in my face, it was cold and grey and didn't look particularly hopeful as I waited for the tide to push into the pool. Pete texted me to say Jenny had just caught a 6:00 at Rosscarbery! The tide arrived but brought with it a lot of green weed; I was only getting four or five minutes a cast before I had to reel in to clear the line. Then ... a drop back bite! I struck and the fish ran right. The tip of my other rod moved suspiciously and I thought the fish had picked up my other line. It hadn't, it was just more weed, but while I was trying to solve this imaginary problem a very real problem was developing. By the time I'd sorted out what was going on with the other line, the fish was right over by the rocks and into the flow that was pouring through the twin bridge arches. I stopped it just short of the rocks and I thought I'd get it back no problem, realising too late that the fish was bigger than I thought. I got some line back but not quickly enough and the fish was still kiting towards the arches. I belatedly started scuttling to the right to get over the fish ... I arrived just in time to see its flank as it was swept into the nearer of the two little arches and under the road!

I just couldn't believe this was happening. I stuck my rod tip down and scrambled round the railing above the arch to get directly above it. It must have been a really good hookhold because I spent over two minutes with my rod bent into the arch and drag screwed down trying to haul the fish back against the water thundering through. I even got a few inches of line back occasionally before the inevitable happened and the trace parted. The video above doesn't quite give the full impression, just take a look at the flow coming out of the arch on the other side of the road ...

I fished on for a couple of hours in pretty dour conditions. The weed continued to be a nuisance. At one point I could see a small piece stuck on my line on the surface, causing the quivertip to nod. I put up with it for a minute or two then started to wind in ... and found myself playing a mullet. It wasn't as big as the one I'd lost, and it came off half way in anyway. I thought, what an appropriate end to a disappointing session.

On the 7th I headed down to Rosscarbery to fish with Pete and Jenny. The west wind was still blowing and I arrived late-morning to find them fishing on the sheltered west bank in the same area where they'd been catching the previous days.

 

I set up legering a bit lower down, but the fish must have been shoaled quite tightly. While I sat without a twitch on either of my tips, Pete was getting regular bites and landed first a 3:13 and then a 4:08 ...

Pete and Jenny packed up for a break back at their rented cottage. I had a brief go at some big fish that were showing close to the rocks in front of the hotel, but these soon melted away. I went up to the cottage for a cuppa, thanks guys.

 

An hour or so later I headed back down to the estuary. There were some fish still showing in the same area where Pete had caught earlier but I thought I'd leave them for the other two and headed lower down again. There was nothing showing in front of me but I felt confident some fish would move through on the making tide.

 

It was not to be: another quiet session for me, but some action for Pete and Jen fishing only seventy or eighty yards to my left. 

 

After missing a few bites, Pete was in again, another good fish. After a good scrap Jenny slid the net under a lovely 5:03 thicklip.

My next outing was on the 10th, back to Rosscarbery with Sylvi to fish with Pete and Jenny again before joining them for an evening meal at the Abbey Bar. Pete had continued clocking up mullet with a couple each day, mostly 4lbers. Jen unfortunately hadn't added to her tally but her six pounder was still the biggest of their holiday! The wind had carried on getting stronger and stronger all week, and today it was only really fishable in the tidal lagoon. We arrived to the news that Pete had had a 5:09 that morning, adding to a 4:14 the previous afternoon in a session when he'd also lost three good fish.

 

We float-fished three in a line along the wall. There seemed to be plenty of little fish around, especially down my end, with my float bobbing almost constantly during some spells. I did have a few more positive bites but I missed all of these. Meanwhile Pete seemed to be getting more of the better bites, and before too long he was in again for another arm-aching struggle. The fish looked huge as Jenny swung it ashore. We wondered if it would make 6lbs but the scales said 5:11 ...

Jenny's 6lber. Photo: Pete Bluett
Jenny's 6lber. Photo: Pete Bluett

Pete added another 4lber on their last fishing day on the 11th. He finished with 13 mullet to a best of 5:13 and four others over the Irish specimen weight of 5lbs.

 

It's a standard of fishing that simply couldn't happen these days in the UK and I found myself nodding in agreement with Pete's post on the Irish Mullet Fishing page on Facebook: these wonderful fish really do need protection from netting put in place before it's too late and they go the same way as mullet stocks in the UK.

 

Jenny had just the one, but the fish of 6lbs exactly was a new PB by some margin.

 

I know they both love the Ireland experience so I'll look forward to seeing them back next year.

I headed back to Rosscarbery on the 13th. Not much was showing anywhere so I started by legering from the grass by the bridge arch. It was a quiet three hours or so, punctuated by a five minute interlude during which I landed a 2:12 after a twitchy bite on my left hand rod. The fish swam over to the right and when I tried to pull my right hand line out of the way, I found myself playing a fish on that too! That one had to fend for itself for a while, but I landed it okay, 4lb 5oz. Not the first, or the last, double header this year ... 

Later on I moved into the lagoon, float-fishing a couple of swims without much interest and no definite bites.

 

I wandered back to the estuary and saw some good mullet moving in the shallows just to the left of the bridge arch. I decided to jump down the wall further along onto the shingle foreshore then wade back towards the arch.

 

The water was very shallow, so I waded as close as I dare to the area where I'd seen the fish, loose-fed some bread then fished with the float set to put the bait about a foot deep. I had loads of bites but they were a real problem to hit, depite the float sliding away nicely. I think the fish must have been pushing the bait ahead of them, not getting it in their mouths. Eventually I struck into one, a nice 2:14 hooked right in the front of the top lip, as if to prove that theory. It was not in the same league as the fish I'd seen from the road above.

 

I waded back for another go, and was getting sporadic bites again after twenty minutes - but I carried on missing them till the bites petered out completely into the dusk, frustratingly.

On the 17th Sylvi and I took the ferry to Whiddy Island in Bantry Bay, to fish the lovely tidal lake behind Baltunta Strand in the south west of the island.

 

Being a Sunday, the first ferry didn't leave till 11.00 a.m. and it's a fair old hike from the harbour out to the lake, so by the time I was tackled up I had no more than five hours to fish before heading back for the last ferry at 5.45 p.m.

 

To be honest though, five hours seemed plenty as contrary to the forecast there was a stiff south-east breeze coming down the lake towards us on the shingle near the mouth of the lake, the only accessible area. And no sign of any mullet!

 

I gave it a good couple of hours float-fishing from the steeply shelving shingle. The breeze died off a bit as the day warmed up and it looked better, but I didn't have a bite or see a fish. I had a brief go on the beach outside the lake, but didn't really like the swim, so I waded over the shallow inlet and fished into the lake from the shingle on the far side. 

 

Again it was quiet, until an after a soporific hour my float buried without any preliminaries. I was surprised, but struck instinctively into a good mullet which didn't run far but chugged deep back-and-forth along the shingle shoreline for several minutes before it surfaced. I hadn't brought my landing net across the inlet with me and Sylvi couldn't get across without getting her shoes wet, so I brought the fish in close and lifted it out by hand. I carried it back over the inlet for weighing at 4lb 4oz and a photo ...

As I was playing the fish, the tide had started flooding through the inlet into the lake. I wasn't sure how deep it would get so with a ferry to catch I thought it prudent not to cross back over.

 

I fished out the last hour or so from the near side and did get more bites, but they were visibly from a shoal of very small mullet about 4oz. No matter - I was pleased with the one I'd caught and we had both enjoyed our day in peaceful surroundings on the island. 

On the 19th I was back on the Mizen in almost identical unpleasant, gloomy conditions to my last visit. The mullet were again scarce and I had just the one drop-back bite. I struck and felt the fish, then everything went slack and stayed slack as I wound in. I was convinced my line had broken, till suddenly a fish shot off to my right yanking my rod round ... it must have swum right in to the wall at speed, most unusual. It was only 2:10, but at least I landed this one.  I looked across at the water pouring through the bridge arches, still ruing the one that got away.

Today I started off at the lovely Lough Hyne just south of Skibbereen, but I barely made the early morning high water.

 

There were a few mullet topping in the bay formed by the pier, they didn't seem to be any great size but that seems to have been the way at this venue recently.

 

My float bobbed and then slid away first cast. I missed that one but was in second cast, a fish that fought above its weight of 2lb 5oz.

 

By the time I'd done the measurements, photos and scale samples for IFI and returned the fish, its mates had departed. I fished an hour then decided to move.

35 minutes later I was back at Rosscarbery. I was keen to try my new-found wading swim again, and decided to start off by giving it a go despite not seeing any mullet from the causeway above.

 

I waded along and fished for twenty minutes or so, loose-feeding tiny portions of mashed bread every cast, and suddenly I was getting whelms in the swim and bites.

 

Again these proved difficult to hit but not as difficult as the other evening, and soon I was playing a mullet that turned out to be 3lb 7oz.

I couldn't get any more interest on wading back, so I moved into the lagoon. I fished from the right-hand pier next to the activity centre.

 

My float shot under on the second trot through. I was late on the strike - the float was already coming back up - but I connected anyway.

 

What was manifestly a very big fish wallowed on the surface. It didn't seem to want to run out, but it swum back and to in front of me. I gave it more stick when it headed left a couple of times as I didn't want it to swim round the far pier or under the pontoon beyond. Then it swam in between the piers, and I thought it might beach itself up the slipway, but it turned and swam out again. I didn't want it reaching the end of the far pier, so I gave it some stick again and turned it. It swam in again, then out again, both times hugging the concete wall of the far pier, worryingly. And then disaster struck, it wouldn't be stopped and went round the end of the far pier.

 

I ran round, first letting out line then reeling it in as I ran out along the far pier. To my dismay the line went underwater then behind the flagpole bolted onto the end of the pier! If I'd have thought I'd have realised there was no way the mullet could have swum behind the flagpole - in fact the pole only protrudes nine inches underwater, the mullet had swum underneath it and I could probably have just slid the line off the bottom. But my eyes were drawn to the mullet, which was wallowing on the surface next to the pole, looking pretty knackered. In hindsight, I should have invested 30 seconds going back to get my net, but then I'd have kicked myself had the mullet been gone when I got back. What I did was try to lift it out by hand ... and I did get finger and thumb of my left hand behind its pectorals and lift it three-quarters out of the water ... and then it wriggled, dropped back in and the tethered trace parted as swam off.

 

I was gutted. It was a big 5lber for sure, probably a 6lber, a great thick fish with a slate black back.

 

I tried further along the lagoon, then back on the pier. I had more bites but the only ones I could connect with were big gobies. I couldn't get the lost fish out of my mind and decided I needed a change of scenery, so I headed down the west side estuary and set up the leger rods. There were plenty of mullet milling around in the shallows, but clearly not feeding as the first hour or so passed without a bite.

Then just as the first of the flood tide started to push through, I had a gentle bite on my left hand rod. It was a good fish - nothing like the one I'd lost but a good fish - and it took seven or eight minutes to get in. I'd just put the net out when my right hand rod nearly pulled over the wall - another double header! I slackened off the drag on the other rod and concentrated on the first fish, landed it, unhooked it, put it back in the water in the net and trapped the mesh under the rim of the net so it couldn't get out. Then I played in the other, much smaller fish and netted that too. They went 5:02 and 2:13. Incredibly they were barely an inch different in length, the 5:02 was so much thicker across the back and deeper.

 

After that ... nothing ... either for me or for the two anglers on holiday from England who had appeared during the preceding chaos then fished just off to my left. It seemed the fish had all moved on with the tide. If you're reading this guys, I hope you had some fish later on.

 

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Sat

09

Sep

2017

Before the Storm

The mullet fishing has been difficult since Steve went home - more on this later - so I was keen to get out on the rocks today before the first of the autumn's gales hits tomorrow. I chose a mark on the south side of the peninsula as the wind was already up from the northwest, driving swells onto the north shore.

I was also keen to give the little soft plastics another go for wrasse, so I started with these.

 

It soon became apparent it was going to be a struggle with the wrasse today. Second cast, a pollack about 1.5lbs latched onto the tiny lure. I was getting plucks most casts, but the next three fish were pollack all that similar size. They put a bend in the rod fair enough, but they were not what I wanted.

 

Then I lost a fish right under the rod tip as I jigged the lure up and down a couple of times at the end of the cast. It dived into the weed and transferred the hook to a kelp root - not sure how they do it so consistently but it's classic wrasse tactic! Another pollack, then finally a wrasse of a couple of pounds. More pollack then another wrasse, a better one this time pushing 4lbs ...

I was pleased with that one, but over the next half hour the knocks I had been getting diminished, and the hook-ups I was getting were all pollack, and these were now mostly less than a pound.

 

The tide was rising and also the wind seemed to be swinging more to the west. It was clear I wasn't going to get much longer on the mark before the swell forced me off, so I decided on a change of tactics for the last few minutes.

 

I tackled up my bass rod with a 2oz bomb and bubblegum pink redgill, and welted it out as far as I could hoping there might be some bigger pollack in the mouth of the bay between me and the next rocky point.

 

I retrieved as slowly as I dared over the rocky bottom and second run through the redgill stopped dead. I raised the rod tip, half expecting the hook to be caught in the kelp but hoping not ... and the rod tip lunged over as a good pollack dived for cover.

 

This is not a particularly deep mark and it is hard work keeping the fish from getting their heads down into the kelp, especially fish hooked at long range. But this time everything was good, the pollack kept coming and after a minute or so a 5lb bar of irridescent copper lay on the surface below me waiting for the net. It is one of my favourite sights in angling.

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Thu

31

Aug

2017

Wrasse ... No, Pollack

I arrived back from driving Steve to the Airport about lunchtime. After a pretty gloomy week weatherwise while he'd been here, today it was bright and sunny. I was feeling inspired  by my efforts with the wrasse on soft plastics yesterday, so I bundled the kit together and headed to a rock mark close to the mouth of Bantry Bay.

 

Well sometimes things just don't go to script ...

I had two pollack for a combined weight of 11lbs, plus two other smaller ones, in the hour before the wind got up and the swells started building, forcing me off the mark. This on tiny little soft plastics barely half the length of the 110mm redgills I usually use for pollack,  in themselves not exactly large as pollack lures go. Food for thought there maybe. Not a sign of a wrasse though.

 

I'll write some more about this soft plastics stuff once I know what I'm doing!

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Wed

30

Aug

2017

Fishing with Steve - Again

Tuesday last week I picked up my old friend Steve Smith from Cork Airport; Steve was over for his annual mullet bash with us. It had been a miserable wet day and we didn't intend fishing, but it brightened up progressively as we headed west and I couldn't resist a look at a mark on the Sheep's Head as we neared home. 

 

I chucked out a few crusts and we watched, but nothing moved to them. Steve however spotted a mullet flanking occasionally as it scraped the stones on the bottom of the shallow gulley. It looked a decent fish, so we headed back to the house, offloaded Steve's suitcase and headed out again with fishing tackle. 

 

Ninety minutes later we packed up fishless, Steve having missed the only bite of the session. I secretly hoped this wouldn't set a trend for the week ahead, especially after the lean trip Steve had had last year.

 

Bright and early we were out to fish the bottom of the ebb and low water on a local rock mark. I really wanted to get Steve off the mark, so I fed bread into the swim little and often while he fished. He was getting sporadic bites almost from the off, and before long he connected with one ...

... which went 3:05, and twenty minutes later another of 2:05.

Mission accomplished, I started fishing too and soon added another mullet to our total, though only a small one of less than 2lbs. We couldn't get another bite after that, but we carried on fishing down to low water and beyond. The change of the tide didn't change our fortune, so we released the mullet from the rockpool where they'd been waiting patiently and headed home for lunch and a quiet couple of hours before going out again for the evening high water.

 

By 5 p.m. we were set up with our leger rods near the top of my favourite estuary on the Mizen peninsula, waiting the arrival of the tide. 

 

It was a pretty quiet session apart from about a half hour feeding period when Steve had a 3:10, I hooked and lost a fish of similar stamp then caught a much smaller one of barely a pound. I'd left my camera at home so thanks to Steve for these photos ...

Thursday was forecast windy with outbreaks of rain, so we headed for Rosscarbery where we'd be able to find some sheltered fishing should the need arise. We had a good look round on arrival, and the only fish we could see moving were around the bridge arch on the edges of the flow out of the lagoon. We set up nearby, Steve deciding to floatfish while I put out leger rods. As it happened I had a clonking bite on my first rod while I was still setting the second up, and landed a nice 4:03 after a spirited scrap. Half an hour later, I was in again. This time the fish came in easily and then ran back and forth along the rocks, staying deep. It was all rather nerve-wracking and I was pleased when Steve finally netted a lovely 5:08.

Steve joined me on leger but although we continued seeing odd fish for a while, we couldn't raise another bite over the high water period. We tried another swim down the west side of the estuary, then the lagoon, both without success.

 

Friday's weather looked promising. We were up before dawn to drive down to the lovely Lough Hyne near Skibbereen. It all looked perfect as the tide inched up, but mullet remained conspicuous by their absence apart from this one little one that dragged my float under completely out of the blue. We packed up after three otherwise fishless hours, and went for a nice breakfast at the Church Cafe in Skibbereen.

 

Then we drove up to Bantry Bay for another crack at the rock mark where Steve had scored on Wednesday. The mullet were ready and waiting and Steve was soon in ... but the fish threw the hook after a couple of minutes. He bumped another on the strike a few minutes later and this properly killed the swim. We couldn't get another bite on bread and changed over to mussel bait - not a bad option for the mullet at all, but today it brought us only wrasse and small pollack.

Saturday early, we headed back down the Mizen to catch the morning high water before a lot of rain arrived ...

As the tide flooded into the pool, I had a little drop-back bite that yielded a 2:14. That was encouraging and we fished hard. A couple of hours later as the ebb tide picked up, Steve had a rod bender that resulted in a 3:02. It wasn't a lot of reward for our efforts but at least Steve was up and running again.

We thought we might get a while on our rock mark in Bantry Bay, but the rain set in as we drove back east so we gave it a miss. We spent a fairly miserable couple of hours on the Railway Pier pontoon in Bantry catching a few miniscule whiting and a solitary mackerel. Not a sniff of a mullet.

 

Sunday dawned foggy but more-or-less dry. We started out on a local pier just to catch a few mackerel for a meal. Steve obliged, catching some mackerel of decent size plus some small pollack on the float with sandeel bait, while I inexplicably blanked using a shrimp rig.

Then it was back onto the rocks in Bantry Bay. The conditions were as good as we'd had but the mullet weren't there ... we both fished for a couple of hours, feeding the swim steadily and varying the depth of the baits, but we couldn't get a bite.

 

Steve was up for some more mackerel fishing so I went back to the car to get the kit and soon had him set up. I went back to the mullet fishing and straightaway missed a bite. It could have been anything but with renewed enthusiasm I chucked in a small handful of mashed bread  ... and a mullet swirled on it as it sank away! I called Steve over, telling him to bring his mullet rod and to keep low.

 

We sat back from the edge, Steve with his rod tip poked over fishing close in while I flicked tiny portions of bread mash at his float. He missed a string of bites, seven or eight at least, before connecting. It was only a small fish, just under 2lbs, and it was soon landed. I thought the one I'd seen was bigger, so I was hopeful there might be another fish there. Soon after starting fishing again, Steve was in to a better mullet just over 3lbs. Unfortunately this second fish became snagged round some weed virtually under the rod tip. We got it out eventually but it was a bit of a faff, and the disturbance probably ended any chance of more mullet. We fished on. Steve hooked a big wrasse, on bread, that made a more comprehensive job of snagging him in the kelp, while I took over the mackerel rod and added a few more to our fish supper, along with my first ever (and very small) Irish garfish.

Monday was the last day of the National Mullet Club's three day National Rover over the bank holiday weekend in the UK. The leading fish was a relatively modest 5:03 and we thought we'd stand a good chance of topping that at Rosscarbery, so we headed south-east for the day. It was an unremittingly miserable day with a stiff west breeze and drizzle expected to turn to steady rain later. We set up the brolly on the grass by the bridge arch and I catapulted out some groundbait. We cast out our leger lines and hunkered down for the duration.

 

We had fish moving in front of us, but they didn't come on the feed till high water. We didn't make that good a fist of the opportunity to be honest. I missed a couple of bites and Steve lost two potentially good fish, one when his hook opened out and one with a possibly over-zealous strike that snapped his trace. Sandwiched between these two misfortunes, he hooked and landed a lovely 5:01...

The feeding spell subsided. I went to buy us some lunch from the Centra store, and had a recce of some other swims - nothing much showing so we stayed put. Well down the tide, we started seeing fish again but further out. I'm not sure Steve was reaching them but I had a couple just either side of 4lbs ...

It was raining steadily now so when our fish moved on again we called it a day. It was a case of close but no cigar as regards the National Rover, but we packed up happyish with our efforts.

 

Tuesday was forecast dry but windy again. We'd hoped to spend the day locally on the rocks in Bantry Bay, but we decided it would be too rough and headed for Rosscarbery again. I'm not sure it was the right decision as the wind never blew up as much as expected and with the calmer conditions and smaller tide we struggled for bites. Steve had a 3:14 on the run-up to high water ...

We hung on in the hope of a repeat of yesterday's late showing, but it just didn't happen. With 20/20 hindsight I wish we'd moved ... after we packed up we had a drive down the west side of estuary and there were plenty of mullet showing in swims that had been devoid of fish yesterday.

 

Today was Steve's last fishing day and a bit of light relief from the mullet fishing was called for. We had collected some limpets from the rocks in Dunmanus Bay on our way home yesterday, and this morning, once the rain cleared, we headed north and west on the Sheep's Head for some wrasse fishing.

 

I set Steve up with a sliding float rig to fish the limpets, and he was straightaway hooked into a clonker that unfortunately got down into the kelp and wouldn't be shifted. A pity but no great matter; Steve enjoyed himself catching a dozen or more nice fish over the session, and losing a few more.

From my point of view, the day was perhaps most memorable for my first wrasse captures on small soft plastic lures, apart from one I caught by accident on a redgill in Cornwall about 35 years ago. I've been aware of the growing trend in lure fishing for wrasse over recent seasons, and I was particularly impressed by a recent article on the subject by Bill Brazier in the Off The Scale online angling magazine. So I'd bought a bit of kit and this was its first outing. I have to say I was comprehensively outfished by Steve with his float & limpets, and I'm not at all sure the soft plastics or my technique or even the (deep) venue were necessarily the most appropriate. Still, from small beginnings ...

Anyway, that was Steve's Irish fishing done for this year. We have meal out in Bantry this evening to celebrate a very enjoyable week, then it is off early to the Airport in the morning. Roll on 2018.

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Sat

19

Aug

2017

Rock Fishing Two Ways

Two different ends of the rock fishing spectrum this week.

 

On Monday - coarse float rod, centrepin, 6lb line, waggler float and size 10 hook. The target was mullet, and I had five, two on bread bait and three on mussel flesh. I kept them in a rockpool pending release at the end of the session. No monsters today, the biggest was a middle-three pounder.

There was just a light breeze at the start of the session but as the afternoon passed it gradually picked up, and by the end it was decidedly fresh with the westerly wind and swells running left to right. 

 

I've noticed before that when the water is lively and the float pushes through, the wrasse take more interest. I had several, some on bread but most on mussel, up to around 2lbs in weight. Although not the intended target, these fish are a good scrap on mullet tackle and I'm pleased to see them.

Then today I dusted off the big rods for the first time in a while ...

Baits were mackerel heads and Aldi king prawn with bluey wrap, both fished as pop-ups ...

And what a great fun session it was. First off, a couple of hours before high tide, was a decent conger estimated 16 - 17lbs on the prawn/bluey, then an LSD on the same bait, then a string of five decent huss all 7 - 9lbs on both baits. High water passed and the bites began to peter out, an hour down the tide I had another LSD and it seemed like a good time to knock off.

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Sat

12

Aug

2017

Pollack on a New Rock Mark

I've been meaning to try this mark on the south shore of the peninsula for ages, and finally got round to doing so this evening. The footpath out along the cliff has been officially closed for some time pending rebuilding of the footbridge over the stream by the car park, but as it happened the stream was running low enough to be able to get across anyway, so off I set. It took a while to negotiate the parts of the footpath that have become overgrown, then to choose one of the several rock promontaries to fish from, then to navigate a route down the rather chaotic rock formations. By the time I was down near the water I had about 90 minutes to fish before I'd have to pack up if I wanted to watch Mo Farah in the 5000m final on TV ...

 

I wouldn't say the pollack fishing was hectic, but it was certainly the best so far this year, possibly related to the arrival of the first decent sandeel shoals in the Bay this week which has seen better mackerel catches and lots of activity by gannets and other sea birds. I had a half dozen mostly 2 - 3lbs but one was nudging 6lbs, the biggest I've had for a couple of years though I have a feeling this mark should turn up some bigger fish later in the year.

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Fri

11

Aug

2017

Mullet Round-up

A few mullet trips over the past week to report on.

 

The mark above is one I've had my eyes on for while as I've occasionally seen mullet in the shallow inlet on my way to the adjacent rock mark.

 

Last Saturday the conditions seemed right, so I took my mullet float rod on a walk across the fields and was pleasantly surprised to find some mullet in residence, and after fifteen minutes or so feeding mashed bread they turned on to it.

 

Sadly although I think there were a couple of bigger fish present, it soon became clear that most were tiddlers. They gave me a bite a chuck for an hour or so till they departed on the first of the ebb tide, but only one got the bait far enough into its mouth for me to hook it. Pretty little fish but it really was little ... bigger ones to come from this spot I'm sure. 

 

On Wednesday evening I fished my favourite estuary on the Mizen peninsula. I arrived a couple of hours before the new tide would flood into the pool, but as half expected at this time of year, the only mullet present were shoals and shoals of tiddlers of all sizes from fry to about a half pound. Still it gave me plenty of time to get my leger rods ready to fish out on the flats from the road causeway as the pool filled up. As the tide arrived my two pop-up crust baits plopped out, followed by balls of groundbait delivered by catapult. It wasn't the best session I've had there, but at least some mullet came in with the tide and roamed around the pool for an hour or so before going out again. I had two out, 3:10 and 3:09. The second was netted and photographed for me by a helpful guy who'd stopped his car for a chat about the fishing, turned out he was a physics lecturer on his holidays, physics is my subject too.

On Thursday I visited my local mussel factory for the first time since May, when I'd found out the mark was topped up with small coalfish.

My hopes raised immediately when I was greeted by a fishy smell and a flock of seagulls, both indicating the discharge pipe had been working recently. In fact it continued to work intermittently throughout the session, gushing opened shells and fragments of mussel flesh across the rocks as they welled up from the pipe which appeared somewhat storm-damaged.

 

My hopes were raised further by the sight of two or three mullet feeding on the surface. Past experience suggested there'd be many more down below.

What followed was a remarkable three hour session in which I landed ten mullet. I'm sure I'd have carried on catching if I'd stayed longer, but ten is enough. All were caught on float, set shallow at first and deeper later on as the breeze got up and the waves dispersed the surface feeders.

 

I alternated between bread bait and mussel flesh, there being plenty of free bait emanating from the pipe. The fish didn't seem to have much preference, though the bites were marginally more positive on mussel.

 

The gloss was only slightly taken off the session by two unfortunate events. The top ten inches of my most recent Preston float rod snapped off drawing the third mullet of the day to the net - I'm hoping I'll get a new section under the guarantee as I've only had it since December. Fortunately I had my leger rods in the car and I know my old Drennan Barbel Specialist rod makes a perfectly serviceable float rod with the 8oz quivertip in. I also lost a stonking fish that ran right off in front of the rocks to the right, only to come off after I'd turned it and it was gradually coming back towards me. It waved a huge tail at me at one stage ...

 

The fish were temporarily confined in a rockpool to avoid them spooking the others when returned. I did some photos as I put them back at the end of the session. These are the biggest, in order, a 4:02, a brace of 4:00s and a 3:10. 

On Friday I was back at Rosscarbery. The conditions seemed similar to those on last week's visit. I fished in the same swim, and there were fish showing, perhaps not quite as many. But what a difference a week makes ... this was a really dour session, five hours of motionless tips apart from the few seconds when both rods bent round at the same time, fishing baits 40 yards apart!

 

The left-hand rod went marginally sooner, I'd just about picked that up when the right-hand rod went. I loosened the drag on that reel and played in the first fish with one eye on the other rod and its mullet occasionally swirling on the surface, fortunately well clear of the one I was playing. Seven or eight minutes later, with the first fish in my landing net in the shallows, I picked up the second rod. The line was slack and festooned with weed, but the fish was still on. Unfortunately this time the weed all gradually slid down to make a massive green ball on the weight, and the fish levered itself off the hook pulling against that lot. I think it was marginally bigger than the one I'd landed, a respectable 3:10 with the tail of a 5lber ...

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Mon

07

Aug

2017

Wrasse

I have a friend coming over in a couple of weeks who likes a bit of wrasse fishing as a change from mulleting, so today I headed off to a mark on the north side of the peninsula to check out the wrasse form. Nothing complicated for me regards wrasse fishing - carp rod, sliding float rig and some big limpets for bait. I'd prefer hardback crabs for bait as preference, but they are difficult to collect here in enough quantity without driving a good way, and the limpets are a pretty good substitute.

 

I walked a bit further round on the mark than I normally fish for congers and huss, and found a nice comfy rock shelf that dropped straight into deep water, so I could fish the float virtually under the rod tip. The wrasse were at home, giving plenty of bites throughout the session and particularly as the tide neared high. They are surprisingly tricky to hit, probably a lot of the misses are small fish, but I accumulated a dozen or so up to a bit over 3lbs, which was enough to prove the point. There are bigger fish there on the mark I know, and I lost a couple that felt better when they found the kelp, though it's hard to be sure as the 3lbers pull pretty hard too! As usual, lots of different colour patterns ...

I finished off with a few casts with a shrimp rig for mackerel - not a sniff - and then I tried with a redgill for pollack. 

 

Three or four casts in  I had one about 2lbs - I decided just big enough for a couple of fillets for a fish & chip supper - but despite carrying on another half hour or so at different spots along the ledge, I couldn't get another.

 

Both the mackerel and pollack have been very patchy so far this year. There doesn't seem to have been many sandeel or other baitfish in either of the bays to bring them in.

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Thu

03

Aug

2017

Rosscarbery Trips ... and a new PB.

I finally emerged from under my mountain of exam marking in mid-July, with just a short window before we had family visiting and then I had another short work-related trip to the UK. Desperate for a mullet fix, on 12 July I headed for Rosscarbery for an afternoon session. It was a bright if blustery day, and Sylvi came too.

There were plenty of fish showing in the shallows down the sheltered west side of the estuary. I set up my leger rods and cast out full of confidence, but the first couple of hours were very quiet, with just a couple of probable line bites.

 

Sylvi went for a walk down to the pier with the dog. 

 

Finally a proper pull came on my right-hand rod, but I missed it. The fish may have moved straight on to my left-hand bait, because a couple of minutes later that also pulled down. This time my strike connected, but it was instantly apparent this wasn't a big fish. A couple of minutes later a pretty little 1:14 thick lip was in the net.

 

Ten minutes later my right-hand rod pulled hard over without warning as a significantly bigger fish hooked itself and headed out towards the middle of the pool. I grabbed the rod, no strike necessary, and hung on till the fish stopped running, then started the process of slowly playing it in. Ten minutes later it was in the net, along with the little one which was still resting in there. I took a photo of the pair of them together, and when Sylvi returned a few minutes later she took the pic with the bigger fish, which I'd weighed at 4lb 1oz ...

 

A few minutes later I had an abortive rattle on the right-hand rod and then, as abruptly as it had started, the feeding spell was over. Cue a final frustrating ninety minutes with both tips motionless as mullet bow-waved and swirled everywhere in the swim.

 

Four days later I was back again. The tide was later and there seemed to be less fish present,  but overall the session was remarkably similar. 

After a quiet couple of hours, I struck into a repeated-nodding bite on my right-hand rod. Again - only a small fish to start, and after a game little scrap I had this 2:01 in the net.

 

While I was baiting that rod up again, I noticed a fish swirl in the shallow water and, in the same instant, my other rod jagging down. This was a better fish about 4lbs but it soon picked up a big lump of blanket weed well up the line. I had a feeling this wasn't going to end well, but the fish hung on as the blanket weed gradually slid down the line towards it. I decided to try to take the weed and mullet together with my net, but in the event I only got the weed. The fish gave a final head-shake as it neared the rim of the net, and was gone.

 

Soon I had both rods fishing again. I settled back in my chair for about thirty seconds, then my right-hand rod heeled right over, and a mullet was running line off the drag even before I could pick it up. Out and out the fish ran, and I began to get fearful of it finding the rocks and branches and other debris on the fringe of the distant just-submerged sandbank. Eventually the mullet stopped, and turned, and the hook came out! Good fish - I was gutted.

It's not that often in this fishing game that you get the chance of instant redemption, but I'd had my lines out again barely five minutes before the same rod lunged over. The long run could have been an action replay, but this time the hook stayed in when the fish turned. As I started to recover line, I could feel it was sliding through a big lump of static weed. Soon I had the fish in as far as the weed. It wouldn't come any further but I kept a good tension in the line, and after a minute or so suddenly the fish was free as the line cut through. I played the fish in without further mishap ... a lovely 5:07 thicklip. It was the last action of the day as the feeding spell again turned off like a tap.

Since my return from the UK trip, the weather has been unsettled with strong westerly winds and big swells running into the bays here on the Atlantic coast. Plans for rock fishing have been put on hold.

 

On 30th July I was back in the same swim at Rosscarbery on a windy day punctuated by rain-squalls. Though few fish were showing, I was confident something would turn up at some stage. But it was not to be ... I packed up after a dour six hour session biteless, damp and disappointed and wishing I'd changed swims after a couple of hours or so in search of some fish.

And so to this afternoon, and more squally weather. I drove down along the west bank hoping I'd see more fish this time but the swims seemed devoid of mullet. I couldn't contemplate another blank like Sunday's, so I turned the car round and ended up fishing from the grass near the bridge arch, facing into the wind. It was choppy, verging on rough as the squalls passed through, but I could see plenty of mullet moving and judging by the size of some of the whelms, there were some decent fish amongst them. I set up the rods and fished one pop-up crust bait well out, the other closer in.

 

It was the close-in bait on the left-hand rod that was taken first, on its second cast. Without any preliminaries, the tip was yanked right down and once more I found myself hanging on as a big mullet streamed line out behind it as it made for the middle of the pool. But today was my day and everything was good. Even the realisation that I'd forgotten to set up my landing net was not a big problem. After ten or twelve minutes I had the fish in close and beached it in a small gulley between the rocks, then picked it up. It was a wonderful thicklip of 5lb 14oz ...

I was soon fishing again but the next hour was quiet as the tide started to edge up.

 

I noticed a fish swimming past repeatedly just beyond the rocks, its head down and the tip of its tail breaking surface. I dropped the close-in bait right into the margins. A few minutes later it was taken, another good fish but not in the league of the previous one. While I was playing it, the distance bait was taken too. I loosened the drag right off on that rod and concentrated on landing the first fish as quickly as possible. Then I left it in the net in the shallows while I dealt with the second one. The line was festooned with lumps of weed when I lifted the rod, but most of this shook off during the fight and I was able to beach it fairly easily. The two mullet were like peas in a pod, weights 4:07 and 4:08.

Fishing again, and after about a half hour I missed a bite on the distance rod. I cast back as close to the same spot as I could, and a few minutes later I struck into an identical bite.

 

At first I thought it was just a small fish, as it gave a token wriggle and came in very easily right to the rocks. Then it saw me and powered out with an impressive bow-wave and a leaving a series of massive whelms in its wake. It hung far out for a good while but then came in quite easily again, kiting to the left and straight into the net as I moved round to intercept it. In truth the fight was nothing like as good as the 5:14 and I was surprised by the size of the fish, particularly as I lifted it from the net and could barely get my fingers across its back. It was a super new PB for me in Ireland of 6lb 14oz ...

I fished on, not caring too much if I caught another fish or not. In the event, I had one more bite on the close-in rod before the feeding spell seemed to come to an end as the tide dropped away. It was the smallest fish of the day, but at 4:03 still well worth the effort of catching.

 

Another angler passed by just as I was landing that last mullet, a guy on holiday from Yorkshire (I think) who came down for a chat as I unhooked the fish. "That's really annoying..." he said two or three times, meaning to see a mullet caught while he was still blank for the week with his orange bubble float and bread-fly. I decided it was best not to tell him about the other four I'd landed.

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Sun

25

Jun

2017

Mullet on the Doorstep

I have a load of work to do from the last few days of May through to mid-July, so the option of some quick mullet sessions on the shore near our home in Kilcrohane is very attractive.

 

A lot of the fish are tiddlers like this one, but get past them and there are some bigger fish to be had.

 

I arrived one particular Sunday evening to find a few fish moving, and I soon had them swirling on loose-fed mashed bread. I had some stabby little bites on my little Puddlechucker float and wasn't unduly surprised when the first fish I connected with was a small one. However, as high water neared I started to see some bigger swirls, and after a few more misses I connected with a much heavier fish which put up a terrific fight trying to get among the rocks to my left ... 4lb 3oz. I waded out again and fished on more in hope than expectation, and as the tide started to drop away another decent fish turned up and started attacking floating pieces of bread. I tried fishing a surface bait but couldn't get a proper take ... I reset the Puddlechucker to fish flake a foot deep and soon had a good bite. The fish felt more solid than the first but the fight was steadier and less spectacular ... 4lb 10oz.

Since then I've had a couple more goes and have caught both times, though only fish in the 2lbs class. They are still nice to catch though in lovely surroundings and only five minutes from our door.

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Tue

30

May

2017

Rock Sessions

I've had a few short sessions out on the rocks recently, making use of some settled weather.

 

First up a trip to a mark on the north side of The Sheep's Head to fish for conger and huss. Disappointingly after a bit of a walk and climbing down to the rock ledge, I noticed one of the local crabbers had dropped a pot in the exact same spot I usually cast to! I relocated thirty yards or so along the ledge and cast into the unknown, only to find it a bit of a snag pit. I persevered and eventually got out a couple of eels before deciding I'd lost enough kit for the day. This the best, just into double figures ...

Also a two short sessions on the south side looking for pollack. I had a half-dozen or so each trip but no great size yet this year. No doubt the bigger fish will follow later in the year but for now, a couple of three-pounders for our tea ...

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Wed

24

May

2017

Mullet Sessions

A couple of mullet sessions to report over the last few days. Firstly to Rosscarbery earlier in the week, where some new flags were flying to welcome me, and some new advice for would-be swan feeders...

I started fishing mid-morning, legering near the bridge arch. Things were inexplicably quiet, despite odd fish topping further out, and after a biteless three hours I relocated down the west side. The high tide arrived and passed, and still no action till the water had dropped away noticably. Then a little pound-size mullet was followed by three bigger fish in a hectic last hour, topped by a nice 4:05.

Then this evening, down to my favourite estuary on the Mizen Peninsula. I was fishing the top of a big spring tide so opted to leger from the road causeway onto the shallow flats below. A quiet start again but then I started to see odd whelms as some mullet arrived with the tide flooding in, and over the high water I had a trio of three pounders out.

The flats are almost uniformly clean, slightly muddy sand so I was surprised to find a snag at one point in the session ... and even more surprised when this happened as I tried to pull clear, losing me the Korda Grippa lead that used to be on the snap link (or saving me the rest of the rig, however you care to look at it!)

 

Anyway, I'm not very impressed with a swivel that can come apart pulling with 6lbs line. It was the first I've used of a pack of Guru brand snap-link swivels, fresh on today. The fact that the black finish has more-or-less disappeared after a couple of hour's use also suggests they may be less than high quality items.

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Sat

13

May

2017

And After the East Wind

The east wind certainly didn't bring any favours fishing-wise ... though the associated dry weather was a bonus for some work we were doing in the garden. Perhaps I should have stuck with the gardening, but I gave over two days to investigating new rock marks. Both marks accessed cleanish ground, and both maybe will fare better later in the year, but I couldn't muster a credible bite from either on a variety of baits. One day the wind fell light enough to get onto a favourite rock mark for some mulleting, but the place was infested with baby coalfish.

 

The easterlies had now been replaced with a southerly, much better but already the strength was kicking up towards a proper blow over the next couple of days. I still haven't seen much by way of mullet locally this year, and these conditions weren't ideal, so I headed down to Rosscarbery.

 

Not so many fish were visible as earlier in the month, but the ones I could see seemed a better size. Both observations were borne out by what was a slowish session, punctuated by occasional bites on the leger baits that yielded three fish of 4:11, 4:04 and another 4:04 ...

After another wait, a fourth mullet of similar stamp was hooked but came adrift. The session petered out after the arrival of the big spring tide high water flooding into the pool, the mullet either moving on or going off the feed.

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Tue

02

May

2017

Before the East Wind

The weather forecast for the next few days or so isn't great, a strong and cold east wind about to set in for a week at least. I was keen to get out fishing before that arrived, and there being little sign of mullet around Sheep's Head yet this spring, I headed down to Rosscarbery. There was already a touch of east in the wind, but mostly it was southerly and running up the estuary, variable in strength but never more than a fresh breeze.

I set up on the west shore of the estuary, two leger rods with pop-up crust baits as usual when there's not many mullet to be seen moving within floatfishing range.

 

A couple of swans latched on to my catapulted groundbait and made a nuisance of themselves, but they soon moved on as the water deepened towards high tide. No sooner had they vacated the area than my right-hand rod pulled over, and I landed my first thickliup of the day at 3lb 3oz.

 

I cast the rod out again and wound in my left-hand rod to rebait. While I was doing that, the right-hand rod was off again, and this was a much bigger fish that took a lot of line in a series of powerful runs out towards the middle of the pool. Unfortunately, as soon as it stopped and turned, the hook came out! Disappointing ... but it was still early in the session so there was a good chance of getting another one.

 

Things went quiet for a while, but as the tide started to drop away after high water, the mullet came onto the feed again and I managed five more thicklips. Alas none came close to matching that lost fish, but it was good fun catching fish of 2:10, 2:07, another 3:03 and a 2:08 that took both baits at almost the same time, and another 2:08 to finish.

2 Comments

Sun

23

Apr

2017

Calm ...

I arrived to find Bantry Bay almost eerily calm, especially considering it was mid-afternoon not early in the morning. Not only was there not a breath of wind, but the almost incessant Atlantic swell in these parts had dwindled to nothing after a week or more of unusually settled weather.

Baits for the day were fillets of mackerel, mackerel heads or whole small squid, fished as pop-ups for this very snaggy mark by wrapping in a small piece of polystyrene with bait elastic.

 

The first hour and a half was really slow but as high water arrived, the bullhuss turned on the feed for the first hour or so of the ebb.

 

First off was a missed take on squid. The bait was still okay so I wrapped a section of mackerel on to it to give its scent a boost, and cast it out again. Within a few minutes I was into a nice huss around 10lbs that put up an unusually good scrap as it came up through the deep clear water. Then a small one about 4lbs on a mackerel head, then a little strap conger on a mackerel fillet that made a right mess of the trace, so I had to tackle up again. While I was doing that, the other rod went but I missed the huss/conger that had taken the squid and hooked into a snag instead ... more tackling up!

 

Finally settled again with two baits back in the water, I found the feeding spree had abated somewhat. As the water was dropping away quickly I started to think about packing up, but then had a nice run on a mackerel head. This one had gone to ground when I struck, but I could feel the fish there and after half a minute it freed itself and I played in another nice huss, this one around 9lbs.

2 Comments

Sat

22

Apr

2017

Mulleting

I've had a few mullet sessions over the last week or so that I can report on - had some fish but nothing very special size-wise.

 

On the 13th I headed down to Rosscarbery for an afternoon session. It was a grey day with a none-too-warm breeze blowing up the estuary. I settled for a favourite west bank swim where I could sit in the lee of the car. It proved a slowish session with just three definite takes on the leger baits ... 2:04, 2:12 and to finish a 3:10.

The 16th was a remarkably similar day, except this time the breeze was blowing down the estuary and if anything was a little colder still. Not feeling too adventurous, I set up in the same swim with the car parked the other way round. It was a bit marginal regards depth as you can see ...

... but as I could see a few mullet moving around from time-to-time I thought it was worth a go. This session was a bit busier with one fish lost and four landed. I had a brace of 3:02s separated by a small one about 1:08. Then finally a fish which put up a much more solid resistance and I was pleased after several minutes to get the net under a chunky mullet weighing 4:10.

The 17th was my birthday. Sylvi and I had lunch at O'Sullivan's Bar in Crookhaven at the end of the Mizen Peninsula, then enjoyed a walk amid fantastic scenery out past Dun Lough Castle to Three Castle Head ... and back. Which just left time to try for a birthday mullet on the way home.

 

We could see a some surface mullet activity in the estuary pool. Most of the fish looked small but I fancied there would be a few bigger ones underneath. It took several casts trotting the float through and loose feeding before I had a bite, then a few missed bites before I was in ... and it was a decent fish too that put up a good scrap, mostly under the rod tip. Eventually I had it into the net and we weighed it at 3:03. We packed up straight away and were back in the car 35 minutes after arriving!

I headed back to the estuary on Mizen yesterday, conscious that the bright sunshine might make fishing difficult. In fact I encountered a different problem. The water level in the pool was the lowest I'd ever seen it, down to a combination of neap tides (when the pool keeps draining and doesn't get topped up), high pressure and very little recent rainfall. Every tiddler that would normally be spread across acres of sand flats was crammed into the deeper hole by the bridge, and I could see several shoals of mullet from herring size down to fingerlings ... and sandsmelts ... and nothing bigger.

 

I fished anyway, hoping there'd be a few better mullet under the shoals of small fry, but my float was constantly bobbing from the attentions of fish that were mostly too small to take the bait properly. I struck the bites that managed to take the float under and hold it down for any length of time ... missed dozens and dozens but eventually had three mullet out. Nothing over 2lbs though, this was the biggest at 1:14.

Finally then, back to Rosscarbery this afternoon - just a short session before heading to Skibbereen shopping with Sylvi.

 

As yesterday, there was a lot of surface activity but most or all of it appeared to be from shoals of small mullet.

 

I fished two leger rods  as usual but despite all the mullet showing it was a slow session, punctuated by just three takes. And yes they were all small fish again. I had one not much over a pound then one of 1:13; the other was a similar size but came off near the edge.

On the plus side, one mullet came out on each rod so I succeeded in christening both of a pair of new reels! They are Daiwa Ninja 3012A "Match and Feeder" reels - and they seem to be nice kit without paying too much, I paid €58 each. I was pleased with the cast and smooth retrieve; the drags will need to wait till another day for a proper workout.

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Tue

11

Apr

2017

Another Day ...

... another rock mark. Again on the south shore of Bantry Bay. And more bullhuss. Three of them today, all on popped-up mackerel heads. Two were about 7lbs, and last knockings out came this one just over 10lbs. This is a good illustration of why I use a wire biting-piece for them ...

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Sun

09

Apr

2017

Bantry Bay Rocks

In contrast to the mulleting, other fishing has been slow recently. I fished a rock mark last week for just a couple of doggies. The only better fish of the day - probably a big huss - escaped when the Sakuma circle hook snapped, there's a first. This was followed by a blank session one morning on Bantry Airport strand, definitely not a first.

 

This afternoon I headed to another rock mark on the Bantry Bay side of the peninsula.

Unusually today I didn't have the spot to myself as three Lithuanian guys were already there. I had to admire their enthusiasm setting up with mackerel feathers in early April and indeed, later on, their persistence in still thrashing away hours after I'd have decided I was wasting my time and gone home ...

 

Still, there was plenty of room for all of us so I set up on the left hand end fishing mackerel head on one rod and squid/mackerel cocktail on the other, both baits popped up by wrapping in a small chunk of polystyrene.

 

I missed bites first cast on both rods and although I kept getting rattles on the mackerel heads it was the other rod that produced the better takes and some fish on the rocks. 

 

First in was a small bullhuss, followed next cast by a larger one, still only about 7lbs though.

 

Next cast there were a couple of tentative pulls that took a few inches of line off the ratchet, then nothing. When I started to wind in a few minutes later, there was a thump on the rod tip which then heeled right over, and I found myself playing a conger. It was no monster but certainly it was a better fish than many of the straps I've had from the rocks here, about 13lbs or 14lbs I would think. Not so big though I couldn't hand-line it out onto the rocks!

What had started out quite a bright afternoon had become gradually duller, and it started drizzling while I was sorting out the conger and returning it. Soon after I'd got two fresh baits out it started to rain more steadily. The Lithuanians packed up and left, and I decided to follow them, not because I couldn't stand a bit of rain but because it had turned the rocks treacherously slippery. It was no fun at all walking back along the sloping ledge to the access point where I could climb up off; I'll try not to get caught out like that again.

 

The area just offshore from this mark is one of five that have been earmarked in Bantry Bay for mechanical harvesting of kelp starting later this year, the first such industry in Ireland. The licence was granted in 2014 but seems to have slipped through on the quiet without any meaningful public consultation or any environmental impact assessment whatsoever. Since it came to light it has been causing a good bit of consternation amongst local fishermen and environmentalists. There's a petition here if you would like to add your weight to the local campaign to have a stay put on the scheme pending proper investigation of its likely impacts.

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Tue

04

Apr

2017

Ten Mullet Day

Today I headed back to the same estuary as Saturday.

 

I was hopeful that the falling water level over the smaller tides would have concentrated the fish into the deep pool, if indeed they hadn't evacuated altogether when they could on the last of the bigger tides. This is a risk particularly in high summer - perhaps when it's warmer they fear the water deoxygenating over several days without a top-up. But equally I've had some big bags in springtime before. Also after a foul day's weather yesterday, I thought there might be a little more colour in the water which might help.

 

On arrival I could see mullet topping occasionally in several parts of the pool ... game on.

 

I set up in the same swim as Saturday, but this time set the float to fish only about eighteen inches deep. I could already see fish swirling around the floating bits of the first handful of loose-feed I'd chucked in, so they were obviously going to feed shallow, at least to start with.

 

What followed was an incredible four-hour session that resulted in ten mullet landed. None of the fish were over 4lbs but who cares really when you can fish in such wonderful surroundings and get loads of bites and rod-bending action from mullet around the 3lbs mark? For the record the best was 3:11 ...

Bites kept coming throughout the session, with longer waits only after a couple of lost fish. I did need to fish a little deeper towards the end as the surface activity gradually petered out.

 

Between mullet #9 and mullet #10, this seatrout of over 3lbs latched onto my bread bait. The bite was identical to many of the mullet bites I'd had, and the fight similar too till the fish erupted through the surface in the first of three spectacular leaps ... but as with so many other fish species, it lacked the stamina of a thicklip.

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Sat

01

Apr

2017

Out West

I tried this spot on Tuesday but apart from one short flurry of bites that culminated in a mullet jumping all around the pool like a seatrout before throwing the hook, all was quiet.

 

Today conditions were more clement: sunny and occasional light cloud, and just a gentle west breeze. I arrived about lunchtime with the water still well up after a big tide. 

 

I fished for about an hour and was slightly surprised not to get a bite. I decided to walk back to the road to see if I could spot any mullet on the other side of the bridge, but after only about twenty yards I was surprised to see a couple of big mullet circling close to the bank. I estimated them both 5lbs+, good fish for this venue.

I returned to fetch my rod and net, then on hands and knees I cleared a little track through last year's reed stems along which I could place my rod and drop the float down into the margins, followed by a few tiny amounts of mashed bread loose-feed.

 

I then proceeded to miss a series of "unmissable" sail-away bites! 

 

After about six or seven, the fish had had enough and moved off. I couldn't believe I'd blown this chance, but I thought maybe if I fished a bit further out and deeper I would re-contact the fish out there.

 

Sure enough, ten minutes later the float slid away, and this time no mistake on the strike. I was disappointed though when a few seconds into the fight it became apparent it wasn't one of the two big fish I'd seen. To add insult to injury, later into the fight the pair briefly reappeared and followed my hooked fish for a few seconds! They were easily a couple of pounds bigger ... the fish I'd hooked turned out 2lb 15oz. 

I stayed in that swim for a while but couldn't get any further interest, so I returned to my first swim so that I could fish more comfortably.

 

It remained generally quiet but every now and then, out of the blue, the float would dip away. There was no rhyme or reason to when or where in the swim this would happen so it was difficult to stay properly keyed up, but after a few misses I finally struck into one of these bites.

 

This fish was more powerful than the previous one, and I had brief hopes I'd contacted one of the big fish I'd seen earlier, but it turned out to be a long, lean 3:07.

I fished on and after a long quiet spell I started to get sporadic bites again. 

 

As the water level dropped and water from the sun-warmed shallows further up moved through the pool, the bites gradually increased in regularity. 

 

I landed two more fish, 2:12 and 3:04 separated by another of similar size that threw the hook after a few seconds. Number Three was still resting in my landing net when Number Four arrived, so I photographed the two of them together. Probably I could have had one or two more into the evening, but I was happy with my haul of four so I packed up in time to do the drive home in daylight.

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Thu

30

Mar

2017

Rosscarbery Braces

Two trips here, separated by a few days, in contrasting weather conditions but with similar results.

 

Last Saturday, and it was back from warmer climes to a chilly easterly breeze that looked set to increase in strength over the next few days. I decided to get out at the earliest opportunity to get some fishing in before the worst arrived. This meant a relatively brief Saturday afternoon session. 

 

I headed for Rosscarbery and although there were good numbers of mullet to be seen, I wasn't that hopeful with the water low and very clear, bright sunshine and the breeze a bit fresher than forecast. I cast out my leger rods well out expecting an attritional session, but in the event I had a good pull-down bite on only my second cast and landed a 4:12 thicklip a few minutes later. 

 

It was quiet for a couple of hours after that, but as the water level (and colour) increased as the flood tide arrived, I had another bite. This time I struck at a couple of knocks and duly played in a 3:11 ... it fought better than the first fish and I was mildly disappointed it didn't turn out a bit bigger.

Then, after an abortive first mulleting trip further west on Tuesday, it was back to Rosscarbery again today, on a mild but drizzly Thursday with the wind now turned southerly.

There was more water in the pool on the bigger tides now, and fewer fish in evidence though I suspect they were still there in similar strength. The session proved remarkably similar with a 4:09 quite early on and then a 3:15 after a longish gap. I had one other knock soon after the 3:15 but it didn't come to anything and the session died a death today as the evening tide flooded into the pool.

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Tue

21

Mar

2017

Namibia Holiday

The time had come, almost a year after booking my flights.

 

This was to be my sixth visit to the Skeleton Coast of Namibia, the first in 2002 having been won as a prize from Sea Angler magazine in UK. This trip was my first since 2010 and I'd be there with my good friend Dave Matthews, our fourth time in Namibia together. We'd have seven days fishing before Dave travelled on inland to a safari with his partner Jane, and I came home.

 

I flew from Cork to Heathrow with Aer Lingus then a long flight overnight with Virgin Atlantic to Johannesburg. I met Dave and Jane at Johannesburg for the onward flight to Walvis Bay where we were met by our guide, Johan Burger. The final leg of the journey was a drive north along the coast through Swakopmund and on to Henties Bay where were staying in a rented house.

 

Our days started at 8 a.m. and we picked up picnic supplies en route for our first fishing which was aimed principally at spotted gully sharks, the intention being to catch a smallish one or two to use as bait and chum for bronze whaler sharks later in the day. Except it didn't quite work out that way this time: the gullies were scarcer than usual and those we caught were often great big lumps up to more than 50lbs. At this sort of size the gullies are good sport in their own right and too precious to use as bait! They are similar to bullhuss in some ways but they are much more thickset around the "shoulders" and consequently much stronger. We caught them on mullet baits (from boxes of small frozen mullet that can be bought in tackle shops) and some on chunks of the small local catfish that took the mullet first.

Having secured the bait - or having decided we'd have to go with the contents of Johan's freezer box which was well stocked with sandsharks and some massive mackerel - it was off in search of bronzies.

 

It has to be said that this trip involved a great deal of driving in search of suitable spots, as we were plagued with a large swell, weed and water temperatures plummeting from unusually high levels earlier in the Namibian summer. The colder water seems to go hand in glove with "sulphur" - brighter green and smelly areas of water that are the kiss of death for fishing, especially bronzie fishing.

The ideal spot is a riptide out through a gap in the offshore bank ... waves come over the bank to either side then the water flows along the gully from both sides before heading out again through the gap. Such a feature gives a good chance of finding bronzies provided the rip isn't too fierce to fish and everything else is right - water temperature up, nice colour, no sulphur and no weed! If everything looks good, out come the big rods and reels for a go at the bronzies ... generally though this time, conditions were marginal in one respect or another. Johan was restless, and often after a fruitless cast or two we were on the move again in search of somewhere better.

When we settled on a spot, Johan would stake the chum out. This would either be a mesh bag full of fish trimmings or the carcass of a gully shark ... the gills and liver are removed to use as hookbait, the tail and fins are removed and several other deep cuts made through the body so that it gradually bleeds out into the surf, hopefully attracting bronzies.

 

The rods are made on single-piece blanks, as there'd be every chance of the rod failing at a spigot joint in a fight with a big bronzie. Johan uses slightly shorter rods than most of the Namibian guides; they definitely let you subdue a bronzie a bit quicker than the longer rods the others use. His reels are big Shimano lever-drags ...

On our first day, Wednesday, we ended up late afternoon at Mile 28 ... that's 28 miles north of the police station in Swakopmund. The conditions looked, well, if not great then better than anything else we'd found.

 

I missed a big drop back bite, and probably the fish moved straight on to Dave's bait where it gave a repeat performance ... except Dave hooked it. It pretty soon became clear it wasn't a bronzie, and soon a cow shark emerged from the surf ... an interesting catch because we haven't seen that many, but to be honest a nasty, snappy thing that doesn't fight very well then contorts itself on the beach trying to bite you!

 

Soon after, I had a proper pull down bite and leaned into the fish a few times to set the circle hook. This was a much better scrap ... not the biggest ever, but a bronzie and I was happy to open our account.

We fished right into the dusk, and last knockings Dave had a pick-up. This was a much bigger fish that streamed line off into the African sunset. The thick end of an hour later, and in pitch dark, Johan waded into the surf to bring ashore Dave's bronzie of around 220lbs ...

On Thursday, the surf was bigger and we struggled to find places to fish for bronzies. After much driving, we settled into a spot in Cape Cross Bay, well north of Henties. It was shallower than most of the places we fish but it had produced recently and it was fishable. We were hopeful of some action as the tide came up but it proved slow.

 

Dave eventually gave up and went off for a walk with Jane ... and they'd not gone a hundred yards before my rod pulled down! This was a bigger fish than I'd had last night, and took about forty minutes to get in. Johan estimated it at about 80kg or 176lbs.

Dave started fishing again and soon had a line bite ... literally ... his rod pulled down then sprung back as the line was cut, a bronzie having picked it up as it searched for his bait with its mouth open. Unfortunately it must have found his cut-off bait and swum off with it, as we had no further interest.

 

The next three days were very difficult with a massive swell coming in off the Atlantic. We caught a few gullies and drove many miles in search of bronzies between Mile 100 north of Swakopmund to Long Beach to the south. The closest we came was a missed take for Dave at Mile 72 on Saturday afternoon ... a good fish picked up his bait and ran out with it, then chopped it off just below the hook.

 

By Monday the swell was dropping and hopes were renewed, though the fishing conditions were far from pleasant ... an unseasonal east wind off the desert raised temperatures on the beach to over 40degC and we were sand-blasted at times when the wind really picked up.

 

We ended up fishing at a mark called Popeye, just north of Henties. I had a bit of a 'mare with two missed chances. On one the line broke inexplicably in the rod rings, the other I made a mess of the pick-up, struggling to get the rod out of its rest it was locked so hard over. Fishing the rod in the rest isn't ideal, but by this stage it was really doing my back standing for long periods holding the rod.

 

Dave did much better, with three bronzies from three pick-ups. The first was a small one but the third was a real beauty of about 120kg or 264lbs, right into the dark again ...

 

Today, Tuesday, our last day fishing, we again ended up at Popeye for the afternoon and evening. It was another scorcher of a day, though we had some shelter from the easterly paint-stripper wind from the sand-dunes behind the beach.

 

I had a pick-up on the last of the ebb tide, just after lunch and in the hottest part of the day, and this was a real powerhouse of a fish. It ran out maybe three hundred yards then hung out in the back for a while. I gradually worked it in but when it got to the surf on the bank it perked up and ran right out again. It came in again gradually, then out a third time. I was wilting in the heat by this stage, but kept the pressure on this time to bring it over the bank. It kited to the right, and Johan was able to wade into the surf to pull it out and up the beach.

 

Johan estimated this one at 105kg or 231lbs, took the pic for me then dragged the bronzie back into the sea. They always swim off well, a delight to see. To be honest I think I was probably more knackered than the fish!

I had an abortive pick-up early in the flood tide but the session petered out after that, perhaps because the water was a touch colder than the day before. Dave unfortunately didn't get a bite all day despite fishing hard.

 

This certainly wasn't our most productive trip to Namibia, but that's the way with fishing and it was a good enough trip in very good company.

 

I booked my flights through the Irish online travel company e-travel and they were great both in their customer support (pay the extra €5 for their support package) and the prices. I paid less than €600 return from Cork to Walvis Bay via Heathrow and J'burg, which curiously was less than anything Dave could find in UK starting from Heathrow!

 

Johan Burger is the best of the Namibian fishing guides by a country mile. He and his wife Joyce run Bushworx and arranged Dave's and Jane's safari tour as well as the fishing.

 

Thanks to Dave and Jane for use of some of their photos here.

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Sat

11

Mar

2017

First Irish 'Six'

After a wet old week, Saturday was a lovely warm and sunny spring-like day and an ideal opportunity to get a March mullet before I'm off on holiday on Monday.

 

I drove down to Rosscarbery and set up on the west side of the estuary, arriving soon after low water. I could see odd fish moving in the shallow water in front of me and to both sides so I was hopeful of some quick action as I welted out both my leger baits.

 

The reality was somewhat different with not a touch for the first four hours. The swans were a complete pain, back and forth in front of me and occasionally one would get its head down on my groundbait. I noticed a pair of anglers set up near the bridge ... but didn't see any action their end either and they left a couple of hours later.

Eventually the new tide reached the estuary pool and the water level started to creep up. This wasn't automatically a good thing as I've noticed sometimes in the winter, the cold sea water entering the pool puts the mullet off the feed. However, today it seemed to have the opposite effect.

 

The first sign of action was a couple of twitches on my right-hand rod that came to nothing and, to be honest, I couldn't be sure it wasn't one of the swans crossing over my line. Then a few minutes later when I started to wind in my left-hand rod, I found myself playing a mullet! There had been no indication of a bite at all so I assume it must have picked up the bait at the exact instant I picked up the rod and started winding ... it wasn't a big fish and I soon had it in, a chunky little 2:14. Half an hour or so later I had another of identical weight after a more conventional repeated-knock bite on the same rod.

 

Another half-hour on, the water was now well up and I could catapult some groundbait out without worrying too much about the swans.

 

I struck into a sharp bite on my left-hand rod again, and an obviously much more substantial fish powered off out. 

 

My wife Sylvi was accompanying some visitors on a day trip out and as chance would have it they arrived to visit me just in time to see the end of the fight and for Sylv to net the fish and take the photo. The fish weighed 4:08 and was in fine condition apart from some old damage to its dorsal fin.

My visitors went on their way to see the stone circle at Drombeg and I told Sylv I'd pack up now as it was starting to get cold in the shade of the trees behind my swim. As I waved them off, I decided I'd have one last cast as I tidied up and started to pack away ... a fateful decision as it turned out!

 

I tipped away the small amount of groundbait I had left and packed away my bait buckets, then decided it would be a good idea to rinse out my weigh-bag. As I was bending over the wall trying to swill it around, I noticed my left-hand rod bending over the wall as well! I grabbed it as quickly as I could, no strike necessary as the fish was obviously self-hooked and was streaming line off against the drag.

 

Its initial power reminded me very much of the 5:12 I had about this time last year. The fish was obviously heavy and made several good runs, and when I could bring it closer it would kite deep left or right. There was no obvious head shaking, which worried me. I thought the fish may be foul-hooked, but when it finally kited left into the wall and came to the surface I could see it was hooked in the mouth, in fact well inside the mouth which may explain why it wasn't trying to shake the hook free. I could also see it was indeed a very big fish, both deep in the body and wide across the back.

 

As soon as I had the mullet in the net I knew it was my Irish PB ... the scales confirmed 6lb 2oz.

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Sun

26

Feb

2017

National Mullet Club AGM

One bonus of our trip to the UK was that it allowed me to attend the Mullet Club AGM held in Portsmouth. It was the first time I'd been for a couple of years. It was nice to meet so many old friends again at one time, and there was a nice buzz about the meeting from the 40ish members present.

 

One good feature of the AGM is that the formal business of reports and elections is dispensed with quickly, allowing time for plenty of chat before the meeting and over lunch, and a series of presentations by guest speakers.

 

This time we had Martin Salter of Angling Trust in the morning and after lunch, Mat Mander of Devon & Severn IFCA both giving conservation-related talks. Then there was a presentation on fly-fishing for mullet by Colin Macleod and finally my good friend Mike Ladle, who'd been doing book signings with me on and off all day, gave the last talk about his innovative fishing as only Mike can. All the speakers did a great job.

Presentation photos by Alan Butterworth.
Presentation photos by Alan Butterworth.

There was loads of other stuff going on at the meeting too, including a tackle stall, a photo display board, a raffle and a separate auction of a mullet print donated by David Miller Art.

 

At the end of the morning session, trophies and certificates are awarded. It was great to see so many fine angling achievements recognised, and I was lucky enough to retain the "Venue Top Ten" trophy with a 2016 season aggregate weight of 50lbs 9oz for my best ten fish, counting a maximum of four from any one venue. I received the trophy from the Club Chairman, Keith Gillett.

I was happy enough with that, but more was to follow, and completely unexpectedly. Out of the blue I found myself being presented Life Membership of the NMC in recognition of my contribution to the Club over many years. My good friend Steve Smith had been approached to write the citation, and awarded me a framed copy, and I was also presented the gift of a wonderful David Miller print ...

The citation reads: 

 

Citation for Life Membership of the National Mullet Club

 

Dave Rigden has been a stalwart of the National Mullet Club for many years. Always very active and energetic, his support for the evolving ethos of the Club has been of considerable and of long standing value.

 

Having held the position of Secretary for many years, in the age of hand written envelopes, snail mail and primitive duplication facilities, he went on to become Chairman generating a period of stability and driving a focus on Conservation. It was in this field that Dave played a pivotal role. By dint of sheer hard work he gathered together disparate statistics from multiple organisations and presented them in a powerful way to fellow anglers, their conservation organisations and politicians alike. This work underpins much of the genuine progress being made today and Conservation remains prominently and continuously on angling agenda across Britain.

 

Since his time as Chairman, Dave continued to play a major part in the smooth running of the Club with collation and distribution of newsletters , practical assistance to the task of distributing Grey Ghost.  Recently he has been a major contributor to our forum and has always been generous with his advice and sharing of experiences. He is joint author of a book on Mullet angling, a welcome addition to the limited canon of authoritative works on this topic.

 

Dave has shown himself capable of catching fish of the highest quality from a wide variety of habitats for many years. When others might have shortened a session or indeed not turned out at all, Dave persevered and his use of innovative methods has yielded always consistent, sometimes amazing, catches across the years. Dave is a great researcher and he used this skill particularly to good effect when considering possibilities in Ireland where he has defined a wide variety of venues  turning them into bona fide Mullet marks.

 

In acknowledgement of his significant work across many years, we hereby confer all honours and privileges of the position of Life Member, National Mullet Club to Dave Rigden.

1 Comments

Tue

14

Feb

2017

Rock Session

Not much fishing to report on in February.

 

I had a blank mullet session at Rosscarbery early in the month; there were still a few fish around just no takers.

 

Then a spell of cold east winds set in for a week, and only abated today. We are off on an extended visit to the UK later this week, so I was keen to get out if not overly hopeful following the easterlies.

 

I chose a deep rock mark on the north shore of the Sheep's Head. For bait I grabbed some mackerel bodies and a bag of heads from the freezer, and fished fillet baits and heads as pop-ups to raise the bait a foot above the snaggy sea-bed.

 

As half expected action was slow to come, but as the tide neared high in late afternoon I did start to get a few knocks and eventually a couple of decent takes, both on heads, and both yielded bullhuss.

 

The first huss was about 7lbs, the second was bigger and put up a good scrap as it neared the rocks. It went just into double figures on my scales. Neither was particularly co-operative about holding still for a photo, so not the best pics I'm afraid ...

I've got a new compact camera, Olympus Tough TG-870, which has loads of features I'll probably never use! I did have a play with the super-macro setting though. Quite impressive I thought ...

0 Comments

Tue

31

Jan

2017

More January Mullet

A couple more mullet trips to Rosscarbery to report on.

 

The 28th was a fresh day punctuated by squally showers so I settled on the shelter of the west bank. The tide was well down when I arrived and no fish were showing close in, so I set about legering at maximum range. 

 

I was surprised to get a good take on only my second cast. The left-hand rod pulled right down but my strike met with no resistance ... I wound in to find a small scale on the hook point from around the mullet's mouth parts.

 

Things went very quiet after that and when the water flattened off occasionally between the squalls I could see just how few fish were present, just a couple of small groups as far as I could make out and mostly staying well beyond my casting range.

 

It was well into dusk and with the water now well up some four hours later before a mullet finally found one of my pop-up crust baits. I struck at a persistent knock on my left hand rod, and after a determined if unspectacular scrap landed this thicklip of 3lb 1oz.

By contrast, this morning was mild and calm and foggy. I arrived soon after the early morning high water, but despite the extra depth after a biggish tide there were still no fish moving close in ... so I was back on the leger.

 

There was more fish activity visible on the surface today, but still it was an hour before there was any movement on the tips. I struck a repeated twitchy bite on the right-hand rod but missed it. I had the line half way in to rebait when the left-hand rod pulled over and a mullet swirled out where my bait was ... but it was off before I could pick the rod up.

 

A few minutes later, the left-hand rod pulled over again, and this time it was fish on. Unfortunately though, not a very big fish and I soon had a pretty little thicklip in to the wall and netted it out. It weighed in at 2lbs exactly.

That was the end of the action for the morning session and soon I stopped seeing much by way of fish moving. I drove over to the Clonakilty estuary and floatfished over the low water period. Despite the float trotting through nicely and seeing a few mullet, I didn't get any bites. As the flood tide started to push up strongly, I decided to head back for another look at Rosscarbery on the way home. I wasn't sure if I'd fish or not, but in the event I found decent numbers of mullet in very shallow water in the north east corner of the estuary pool and I couldn't resist having a go for them. It turned into quite a frustrating session with fish swimming all round my baits but not a single take or even (remarkably) a line bite. The joys of winter mullet fishing - I think the water may have been a degree or two too cold for them to feed properly - bites from odd fish and/or  in short feeding spells seems to be the order of the day.

0 Comments

Sun

22

Jan

2017

Underway in 2017

It's not been a hectic start to 2017.

 

I've had two blank mullet trips, a night session on a local pier that produced only two poor cod and the smallest conger I've ever seen, and today a session on the rocks locally that produced a few rattly bites but nothing that held on to the large hooks I was using for huss or conger.

 

In the midst of all this, a small success story. I headed down to Rosscarbery last Tuesday for a go at the mullet. I'd been there the previous week and blanked, though I'd seen a few mullet moving. Today was such a mild day I really fancied my chances if there were any mullet present. It was so calm when I arrived I was sure I'd see any mullet if they were about, but disappointingly the normal swims down the west side of the estuary pool seemed barren of fish. I walked round to the bridge arch, still without seeing anything. Then, to my relief, I saw a few fish moving further along to the east.

 

It's not an area I've fished before as it requires an awkward jump down from the road causeway then an undignified scramble back up at the end. Still, needs must ... a few minutes later I was back with my kit. I had one leger rod set up so I put out a pop-up crust bait on that while I set about making up my second rod. The line was half-threaded up through the rod rings when I noticed a couple of bumps on the tip of the rod in the rest. Line bites probably ... I stopped a moment to watch, and suddenly the rod pulled right over. I grabbed it as the rod rest threatened to collapse, and a great scrap followed with a thicklip that turned in at 4lb 6oz ...

 

It was my first ever January mullet, and also the one that meant I had caught mullet in twelve consecutive months from February 2016.

 

Sadly though the little group of fish had melted away. I fished on for 90 minutes without another touch, then decided a move was in order. As there didn't seem to be a lot of fish at Rosscarbery I relocated east to the estuary below Clonakilty.

 

The tide was about half way out when I arrived, and I started to see mullet moving down with the ebb. As the flow eased off towards low water, the number of fish increased and by the low water slack there were hundreds in the stretch where I was. They were bow-waving, swirling, splashing and jumping ... everything apparently except feeding, as I couldn't get a single bite and left in frustration as the light faded away into the evening. A couple of days later I went back. It had been a colder night and it was a colder day with a touch of east in the breeze. As far as I could tell there was not a single mullet in the estuary.

0 Comments

2016

Sat

10

Dec

2016

More December Mullet

Make hay while the sun shines. Or translated for West Cork, catch mullet while the mild, still, misty weather persists ...

 

I arrived at Rosscarbery to find the water still well down and mullet all over the estuary pool topping, bow-waving and occasionally jumping. They seemed slightly more numerous near the top end so I walked round to the grass bank by the bridge arch and set up my leger rods there.

I was getting knocks from the off, most of which were probably line bites. I struck and missed one on the left-hand rod that seemed a bit more persistent, then while I was baiting it up again, the right-hand rod nodded twice and I was into a smallish mullet on that which came off half way in.

 

Over the next hour it was literally a bite a chuck and I couldn't get both lines out at the same time ... four mullet resulted, all the smaller classes of fish that seem to have arrived en masse over the last month. They weighed 1:12, 2:09, 2:10 and 3:01. Then after a slight slowing of proceedings another of 2:10. Not the biggest mullet in the world but it was really great fun getting plenty of bites and each fish giving a great scrap.

At this stage, a band of scum announced the arrival of the new tide from the channel to my left. The mullet turned off as if someone had thrown a switch - suddenly no bites and hardly any fish topping. I can only presume this is a temperature-shock effect as the cold sea water pours into the pool.

 

The last few fish I saw moving were right down the bottom of the pool so I wondered if they had all moved off that way ahead of the sea water. I packed up and moved down the west bank but by the time I arrived there were no fish visible there either.

 

A very slow couple of hours passed and it wasn't till the water had started to drop away towards dusk before I started seeing fish again. I had a couple of line-bite bumps and then finally a good take. A terrific stubborn fight followed from a fish that turned out to be another 4:10 ... definitely not the same fish as Thursday though as this one was longer. When I first saw it in the edge I thought it was going to weigh more but it was quite lean down its flanks.

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Thu

08

Dec

2016

December Mullet

I'd never caught a December mullet before. I'd caught late into November on the south coast of England, but that was always a bit of a struggle and I'd run out of enthusiasm by the time December came. Years ago I took a pre-Christmas trip to Alderney and managed to blank.

 

December is a busy time of year for me work-wise. Last year I'd missed out on some potential good fishing, finding out after the event there'd been big shoals of mullet at Rosscarbery. So in the current mild weather I was determined to get out ...

 

I arrived to find good numbers of mullet in the shallows down the west side of the estuary, so I was keen to make a start. As I unloaded my stuff from the back of the car, I was dismayed to realise I'd left my landing net head at home. I had to relocate a hundred yards along the wall so I could fish close to an area where I'd be able to beach hooked fish ... not a problem in itself but the road is much narrower here so I wouldn't be able to fish out of the back of the car, and there was a persistent heavy drizzle.

 

The session really was unremarkable apart from its timing so late in the year.

 

I put out both leger rods with pop-up crust baits and catapulted out balls of groundbait into the area they were fishing.

 

This attracted the attention of the swans that seemed both more numerous and hungrier than earlier in the year. They were a bit of a nuisance but fortunately didn't get their heads down onto my groundbait. After a while they moved on.

 

The mullet became less visible as the depth crept up towards high water, but dead on high my left hand rod pulled hard over and I was into a good fish that stripped line in four or five powerful runs before calming down and coming in gradually. I edged my way left along the wall and beached the fish where the water shallowed up towards a small island, then jumped down the wall to grab the fish. It was a perfectly conditioned thicklip of 4lb 10oz, my first ever December mullet.

 

This marked the start of a feeding spell of sorts and over the next hour or so I had three more thicklips that weighed in at 2:13, 3:02 and 3:04.  

 

This size class of mullet had predominated earlier in the year but had been largely absent through the summer and autumn when most of the Rosscarbery stock seemed to be big 3s, 4s and 5s - I wonder where they have been since the spring?

 

As the water dropped away significantly the bites seemed to dry up, and the swans came back. I was getting progressively soaked by the drizzle and I was happy enough with what I'd caught, so I decided to call it a day.

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Wed

07

Dec

2016

Pop-up Crust

National Mullet Club's Grey Ghost magazine is arriving with members about now. I have an article in it about fishing the pop-up crust leger bait that has been so productive for me in Ireland this year, and before that at venues such as Christchurch and Broadwater in the UK.

 

If it helps, here is the picture sequence for baiting up that appears in the article, in colour ...

1 – piece of crust about 15mm x 20mm and a section of grass stalk

2 – hook in from the flake side

3 – pull the hook through, turn it and back in from the crust side

4 - trap the section of grass stalk in the bend to stop the hook cutting back through the crust

5 – the rig: size 10 Kamasan B983, 8” of 5lb Drennan fluorocarbon fly leader, swivel, buffer bead, 1.1oz Korda Grippa lead on sliding link swivel, moveable stop of silicone tube with the line through twice. Mainline is 6lb ProGold.

6 – the baited rig

2 Comments

Sat

05

Nov

2016

At Christchurch Again

After work meetings in Cambridge I headed down to the south coast for a few days before returning. It proved to be a fairly hectic stay trying to dovetail work stuff with seeing family and friends, but on Saturday I managed to steal a few hours to fish in the morning, before driving back to Cambridge later that afternoon.

 

I set off across Stanpit Marsh before it was properly light. My friend Dave Matthews had been catching up to last weekend, but the temperature had plummeted this week and the heavy frost on the ground didn't bode well. On the plus side I was treated to a wonderful dawn as I set up to fish the river channel down from Grimbury ...

Before long a light but cutting north breeze had cleared away the mist. I fished through the low water period without a sign of a bite and the only fish sighted were occasional small seatrout jumping. As the tide started to edge up I had a few rattles on the tips; they were difficult to hit but eventually I hooked a couple and confirmed my suspicion that they were dace.

 

It was nice in the sun and out of the breeze behind my brolly. Alan Butterworth turned up and we chatted for a few minutes before he resumed his walk round the marsh.

 

As the water reached the peaty bank I had a lunging bite on the right-hand rod, and played in a little thicklip of 2:12. A while later a repeat performance on the left-hand rod produced a 2:13. And that was it, despite fishing on a while longer. Not the biggest fish but both pristine and if they turn out to be the last mullet of my 2016 I'll be happy enough.

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Fri

28

Oct

2016

Fishing for Ghosts

I found out today that my long-term writing project with Mike Ladle has finally been published. Mike and I wrote the first draft of the book - now titled "Fishing for Ghosts" - way back in 1990. At that time it turned out Mike's previous publishers weren't interested - mullet fishing too niche - and we had a similar result when we tried again a few years later.

 

Since then it had been a case of "we must do something about the book" without ever getting round to doing anything, until Mike sent Medlar Press a couple of chapters in 2013 and they wanted it! Only trouble then was that the text was pretty out of date, so we spent the thick end of a year rewriting sections and adding new material, and I recruited Paul Fennell and Nick Murphy to add sections on kayak fishing and dinghy fishing for mullet respectively. We spent the summer of 2014 sourcing more and better photographic material and the package went off to Medlars in the autumn.

 

Since then it's been slow progress but the outcome was never in doubt and I'm pretty pleased with the book, especially considering it's my first (and probably only) attempt.

 

If you're interested in mullet fishing or just in collecting angling books, you can get more detail and order a copy from the Medlar Press website here.

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Fri

28

Oct

2016

Two Mullet Sessions

I have an extended visit to the UK coming up followed by a load of work to do. I wasn't at all sure what the mullet prospects would be later on in November and into December when I might get a chance to go again, so I was keen to get out this week.

 

First up on Wednesday, a trip to Rosscarbery for a relatively short afternoon session. I headed straight for the shallow west bank swims that had been so productive for me this year, and set up both leger rods to fish the pop-up crust baits that had done so well. The tide was well down so I cast well out and sat back to await developments. 

What followed was a pretty decent late season session with a couple of bites missed and three hit, which resulted in a trio of healthy mullet all 4lb+ ...

Then today I headed south-west onto the Mizen Peninsula. The shallow estuary looked bleak and windswept on a very grey autumn day, and there was no sign of fish moving. Still, I was there to fish so fish I did, setting up on the road causeway ...

For a couple of hours my worst fears were realised, with not a touch on either tip. Then as the pool filled up near the top of the tide, a few fish must have come up the estuary. First, a massive slack-line bite missed. Then two more smaller drop-backs, both of which resulted in mullet landed. They were smaller than the Rosscarbery fish at 3:05 and 3:08, but still very welcome.

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Wed

26

Oct

2016

Saved by a Conger

It was an unusually quiet session on the north of the peninsula today. I had just a few rattles that didn't come to anything and a couple of small LSDs. Then near the end the session was rescued by a proper run at last on a popped-up mackerel head and this character joined me briefly on the rocks ...

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Thu

20

Oct

2016

Mullet Large and Small

Two mullet sessions to report on this week.

 

On Tuesday I went down to Rosscarbery to catch the last of a series of really big spring tides. Although I arrived well down the ebb, the estuary pool had had a really good top-up and there was plenty of depth to fish the west side swims throughout the low water period.

 

I fished two leger rods with pop-up crust as usual.  The first hour was slow, but shortly after missing the first, rather half-hearted bite I was into a good fish that pulled the left hand rod over. It turned out to be 4lb 3oz ... 

Soon after I was in again on the same rod, a fish that ran out strongly and then, to my surprise as it's not happened before in this swim, it found a snag. I tried for several minutes giving it slack line and pulling from different angles, but in the end I had to pull for a break.

 

I put out a fresh bait on the other rod while I was tackling up again. A couple of minutes later I just managed to catch the rod by the butt as it threatened to pull over the wall. The fish didn't hang on though! However, soon after casting out the retackled rod I was in again. This was another good fish and they seemed to be fighting well today with the few inches extra depth. It took a full fifteen minutes to get the mullet in: 5lb 1oz.

After a lull in proceedings I had a couple more fish. The 3:11 on the left was interesting as it had an almost identical but slightly healed lower lip hook wound a few millimetres over from the new one ... almost certainly it was a recapture having taken pop-up crust for a second time in a few weeks. When he was over recently, Eddie Baker left me some white hooks to try. Their provenance is a bit uncertain, other than that they came via the United States, my best guess is that they are a discontinued Owner Chinu version. I'd tied one on  today for the first time when I retackled and the 4:12 on the right was the second victim, the first having been the 5:01. I was a bit uncertain about using them as they are a good bit larger than my normal B983 size 10s, around a size 6, and a lot thicker in the wire ... but, no problem. 

I have been gradually amassing scale samples for IFI this summer and autumn, but I was conscious that most of these were from larger mullet: big 3s, 4s and 5s. I really wanted to get scales from a few smaller fish for a better balanced sample, so early on Thursday morning I headed down to Lough Hyne near Skibbereen and caught the morning high water. This is a very different venue to Rosscarbery and the other estuaries I fish - very deep, cool water and the mullet leaner and a good bit smaller on average. I'll be interested to see what comes out of the age readings of the scales.

I arrived around 7.40 a.m. and could see movement in the bay to the left of the pier, but there was a heavy overcast and it was 8.00 a.m. before it was light enough to watch my float more than a few feet away.

 

I was soon getting regular bites, missing a few but hitting a few as well. Over a couple of hours I landed six mullet and it was mission accomplished as regards getting some smaller fish, with five of them falling between 1lb 12oz and the one of 2lb 9oz in the photo.

 

The third fish of the morning proved rather more substantial. It fought long and hard in the deep, clear water in front of the pier, and proved to be a lovely 3lb 14oz thicklip ...

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Mon

17

Oct

2016

Evening Pollack Session

It was a blustery grey day here today. I went out for a brief evening session for pollack, choosing a spot on the south coast where I could get high above some deep water close in.

 

It was very nearly a bite a chuck on a pearl-white redgill, but the pollack were generally small, between about 12oz and 2lbs. It would probably be better to try to fish more selectively with a bigger bait this year - there really do seem to be huge numbers of small fish about I think beating the bigger pollack to the bait.

 

Anyway, the numbers game eventually paid off and I had one last knockings just under 5lbs to take home ...

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Sat

15

Oct

2016

Hard Work but ...

I fished today at an estuary on the Mizen peninsula. There had been a lot of mullet showing there on the same tides a fortnight ago, on a day I wasn't fishing for them, but that was a fortnight ago and today I was disappointed to see hardly any mullet activity as I looked around on arrival. There were a few shoals of fingerling fish surfacing from time to time, but that was all. The  breeze was just about southerly so whether it was still recovering from the east winds of the last two weeks or now winding down for the winter, I don't know.

 

I set up to float-fish in the deep pool just above the bridge. The float was trotting through nicely left to right, with the breeze in my face gradually pushing it in closer to the bank. Many trots later, the float dipped near the end of the run ... missed it, but I was ready for the repeat performance on the next time through and struck into a weighty fish.

 

The fish chugged all round the pool staying deep, but never did anything very spectacular. Eventually it weakened and a very thick-looking fish surfaced. Soon after I had it in my net. It weighed 5lbs exactly, and I was well pleased with that as it was only my second "five" from this venue.

I fished on, in all spending about three hours in that swim, but had no further bites. I moved to the rocks on the other side of the bridge, set up my leger rods and cast out onto the shallows on that side of the causeway. I had a couple of very half-hearted knocks over another hour or so before the new tide arrived and started pouring through the bridge arch. The weed that came with it made life difficult so I decided to move again onto the causeway so I could fish directly up the flow instead of across it. As I collected my stuff together I noticed the largest Hereford bull I've ever seen in the small field behind where I'd been fishing, separated from me by a couple of gorse bushes and some bracken! I moved off very gingerly ...

Soon I was set up again on the causeway and fishing more effectively. It remained quiet for another half hour or so, then a drop-back bite on my right-hand rod produced a nice 3:13. A twitchy bite on the left-hand rod turned out to be a much smaller fish that came off once I had it near to the wall. I missed a decent pull on the right-hand rod, then hooked a powerful fish after another drop-back. It kited round to my right and spent some time banging away close to the rocks before catching in the flow that was now in full flood through the bridge arch. I moved right along to get over the fish but eventually the hook came out and I imagine that the mullet was whisked away under the road! I saw the fish several times; it was not far short of the five pounder I'd had earlier in the day. The right-hand rod was soon in action again, this time a fish of 2:12. While I was unhooking it I missed a massive pull-round on the left-hand rod. And then, as quickly as they'd turned on, the feeding spell was over. I fished on a while, but had no further interest at all. As fishing days go, it had been hard work, but worth it.

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Thu

13

Oct

2016

East Wind Mulleting

We've been plagued by east winds of varying strength for well over a week now. All forms of fishing seem to become instantly harder with the easterlies blowing; mulleting seems to hold up better than most, but after a few days even the mullet seem to go off the feed.

 

Wednesday last week I fished a newish mark south and east of Skibbereen, crucially on a west facing shore so I'd be out of the worst. I'd fished the spot briefly a couple of times before and had seen mullet on each visit, but I was yet to catch one there or even have a definite bite. Today I arrived halfway down the ebb tide and immediately saw a couple of mullet working over mudflats near where I parked the car, but I chose to ignore them to go and floatfish some deeper water a few hundred yards away. It was a mistake, and three hours later I returned to the mudflat area without having had a bite.

 

There was barely a foot of water over the flats now, but I could see a half-dozen or so decent mullet moving around. It was too shallow to floatfish sensibly so I set up my leger rods and cast out a pop-up crust bait on one and flake on the other. I fished an hour or so without a bite but as the new tide started to push up the shingle, some interest at last. I had a couple of very sharp tugs on the flake, but nothing hung on; I missed a half-decent take on the crust; then more tugs on the flake that came to nothing.

 

By this time mullet were moving close in so, frustrated by my failure to catch on leger, I dropped a float out just past the bladderwrack fringe, fishing flake a foot deep. After a couple of minutes the float bobbed but didn't move away; I left it and after another minute it buried, and I struck into a good mullet that immediately cartwheeled out of the water then ran out strongly.

 

The fish put up a good scrap. At one stage I had to wade out and free the line from a clump of weed it had swum round, but I landed it without further mishap. I was pleased with this 4lb 8oz thicklip as the first fish from a new venue ... 

The east wind strengthened even more over the next couple of days but it dropped for the weekend and on Sunday Sylvi & I went down to Rosscarbery to fish with my friends Pete and Jenny who had arrived from Cornwall on Saturday for a holiday of just under a week. The easterly was just a breeze, but it still looked like being a struggle with the water level very low on the neap tide and the water very clear.

 

Pete and Jen were fishless by the bridge arch so after chatting a while I left them there and set up my leger rods down on the west shore. The water was almost silly-shallow (at one stage an egret waded through my swim) but I could see mullet moving from time to time so I was hopeful of some action.

 

About an hour later the first mullet of the day took a fancy to popped-up crust ... but it came off after a minute or so, leaving me to wind in a scale on the hook! Over the next few hours I had four more takes, properly hooked this time, and all held on. The biggest mullet was the last at 4lb 12oz...

Pete and Jenny had a much quieter day. Jenny had a nice fish of 3:10 soon after I left them, trotting a float through on the flow of water coming through the bridge arch.  Unfortunately that was their only action of the day, despite a couple of changes of swim.

 

Even more unfortunately the east wind picked up in strength overnight and throughout Monday. It was particularly strong on Tuesday when I met them at the mark where I'd had the 4:08 last week. It was semi-sheltered there but we didn't catch.

 

Other than that they fished at Rosscarbery but struggled for bites, catching a fish each on Monday and just one late in the day for Pete on Wednesday ... his first on the pop-up crust technique.

I headed back to Rosscarbery on Thursday, after my car had its NCT in Skibbereen. The car passed, so perhaps a lucky day was in store.

 

The wind had let up a bit overnight. The water in the estuary was very shallow and the lagoon looked a better option to start.

 

As it happened I must have struck lucky and chosen a swim with a mullet ready and waiting. I had a bite first cast and missed it, but I was better prepared second cast when the float dipped again. 

 

It was a nice if slightly lean little thicklip of 2lb 10oz, not a monster but my first from the lagoon in over a year so I was happy with that. After returning the mullet I couldn't raise a bite in that spot or two others I tried, so soon after Pete & Jen surfaced for the day we decided it would be better to try the estuary.

Pete & Jen stopped by the bridge arch where Jen promptly had out a 3:11 on leger on her first cast and Pete missed a couple of good takes.

 

I went down the west side but stopped at the little grassy island, leaving the swim lower down where I'd done well on Sunday for the others later on.

 

I cast well out as the water was still shallow, and I also had some action on my first cast. Trouble was, I thought the tip movements on my right-hand rod were down to two swans over my bait, and it wasn't till I realised the line was moving off left while the swans were heading straight out that I twigged what was going on. I had to pass the rod under my left-hand rod as the lines had crossed, and by the time I'd sorted myself out the fish was into a snag to my left, a long length of barnacle-encrusted rope part-buried in the mud, and it cut my trace. Great start. The east wind had swung to south-east (right in my face) and was picking up again with the tide. Everything was quiet on the fishing front for the next hour or so, during which time Pete & Jen passed by en route to the swim lower down.

My next bite was a little slack-liner on my left-hand rod. I struck into the fish. It seemed a little subdued and I had it in my net after three or four minutes. The hook had gone through its lower lip from just outside its mouth then into its top lip, so its two lips were stitched together and it may well have had trouble breathing during the fight!

 

I had weighed the fish and was just doing the photo when I heard the drag going on my other reel - I'd slackened it off just in case, and a mullet had taken the pop-up crust and was taking lots of line. I hurriedly put the first fish into the margins in my landing net, and dashed back to my rod. The fish had run to the left but fortunately far enough out that it was clear of the snags and by giving it lots of wellie I was able to bring it back to my side of the rock. Pete arrived with his landing net to help, but it was another five or six minutes before the fish was ready as it really dug in under the rod tip. It went 5lb 13oz, a lovely fish indeed ...

I set up again expecting the swim to be quiet after all that, but after just a few minutes my right-hand rod lunged over again.

 

The fish ran left at speed - fortunately I was just baiting up my left-hand rod at the time. Also fortunately it went straight past the snags and once into the shallows on the left side of the island it surrendered quite quickly: 3lb 2oz.

 

I was beginning to feel a bit uncomfortable about bagging up while the others weren't catching, so I wandered down to see them for a chat and a break. 

 

Pete was at least getting bites but seemed to be in a run of bad luck ... he'd missed another good take, then a fish had broken his 6lb mainline, and while I was there he struck into another ... only to play it in and find it was hooked near the ventral fins.

I drifted back to my rods and had another cast. Incredibly the right-hand one pulled down again after only a minute or two, and after a game scrap I landed another 3:08.

 

Five in a day was enough. I packed up and catapulted out some groundbait in case Pete might want to move up into my swim, then went down for another chat.

 

After a couple of minutes, Pete had a little knock on his left-hand rod, perhaps a fish bumping the line on its way to his right-hand bait, because it was his right-hand rod that pulled over. 

 

Everyone was on tenterhooks as Pete played in the mullet, a fairly-hooked 3:10 ...

I left feeling happy that Pete was getting bites on the pop-up crust having changed over to fishing it consistently, and thinking he stood a good chance of a few more fish as the light faded and the wind was dropping again. Alas it was not to be ... he had more bites but they resulted in a broken trace and a fish around 5lbs but foul-hooked again, this time well back from the chin. "One of those days" doesn't really do it justice.

0 Comments

Sat

01

Oct

2016

Mixed Stuff

A mixed bag of stuff here covering the last few days; none really seemed to warrant a blog entry on its own.

 

On Tuesday I grabbed a couple of hours fishing in Bantry while Sylvi did some shopping and had her hair done. The harbour there has a lot of development work going on, including a new pontoon extension for the old railway pier that is currently being used for the Whiddy Island ferry while construction work goes on around its old berth. Swimming and diving are prohibited from the pontoon, but fishing is allowed ... 

 

I set up with sliding float tackle for mullet on the harbour side of the pontoon towards the end. I plumbed the depth - about 14 feet - so set the float to fish around 12 feet and fished breadflake, dropping in loosefeed.

 

A couple of guys were fishing from the end of the pontoon. One was getting plenty of mackerel on a set of feathers, the other catching them singly on a Toby-type spoon. So it wasn't a huge surprise when my float first slid under after a few minutes and I struck into ... a mackerel. Two more followed, then a few bites that I missed ... maybe a mullet, but probably more mackerel. Sylvi arrived; I changed to a mackerel-sliver bait which upped the bite rate and she landed a few more till we had enough for a good meal.

 

On Wednesday I headed to a shallow estuary south-west of us. It had fished really well for mullet early on in the season but really poorly recently. Today it was still carrying a peaty stain, the surface was ruffled by a stiff breeze and there was not a sign of mullet moving around. I feared the worst but I did in fact have a few flurries of bites. I should have done better but ended up with just the one fish, 3lb 6oz ...

Unfortunately soon after landing this one the new tide flooded through the bridge arch into the pool where I was and killed the fishing. I'd normally have moved to fish the shallow flats on the other side of the road with leger tackle, but it was so rough by this stage I decided to give it best.

 

Thursday was a miserable day weather-wise. It stopped raining late in the afternoon and I spent the evening fishing for mackerel from a local pier ...

The float was one of a batch I'd recently bought online, made by Maver. I've not had a lot of call for big waggler floats since I stopped travelling to Alderney but I saw these and thought they might come in useful  here. I remembered being very disappointed with the last few batches of large Middy wagglers I'd used - the stems seemed very fragile and kept snapping on the strike - so I hoped the Maver ones would be more robust. They certainly seem up to the job, though one curious issue is why the 4SSG size apparently takes 5.5SSG shot to cock it properly! Not that I'm complaining, I'd probably have bought a 5 or 6SSG size had it been available, the shot load certainly makes casting the float a doddle and pulls the line through easily till the stop-knot reaches the bottom eye and the float cocks.

Friday was almost a repeat on the weather. This time for my evening session I decided to spin for pollack. There was too much swell running to get onto many of the best rocks, I eventually settled on an area on the south coast where it was just about fishable. I caught a succession of smallish pollack and kept a couple of the better ones, 2 - 3lbs, for a meal. I get the impression bigger pollack are scarcer this year, though in fairness I've not tried a lot having been concentrating mainly on mullet. 

 

Amongst the pollack was a single coalfish about 1.5lbs ... it's early for them, apparently there's a November run (including some bigger fish) that I missed out on completely last year due to work commitments. One of my facebook friends commented that some anglers get muddled up between pollack and coalfish, but when you see them side-by-side the differences are very obvious. He's right, especially the striking difference in the lateral line ...

Today, Saturday, I headed south-west again to fish a pier mark near Mizen Head I've been meaning to visit for ages.

 

On the way I stopped to dig some lugworm and then again by the estuary I'd fished on Wednesday to have a look. It was now crystal clear having been flushed out by the bigger tides and scores of mullet were visible on the flats that had been too rough to fish - typical!

 

I moved onto the pier, found via a pleasant walk from the road down what appears to be a private drive, then onto a winding grassy track for the final descent down the cliff. 

 

As with so many piers in Ireland, it rather begs the question, why did somebody bother to build it here? But it certainly makes for a spectacular fishing mark. Off to the right, there were some of the biggest and noisiest seals I've ever met in and out of the sea caves. Out in the bay, harbour porpoises showed from time to time.

 

Alas the fishing didn't really live up to expectations today. The information on the Sea-Angling-Ireland site suggested I'd be fishing over a mixed bottom with the possibility of thornbacks, plaice and bass as well as rock species, but as far as I could tell it was predominantly rough ground. The lugworm attracted only starfish, I had a couple of small pollack on small sandeel baits, and a bullhuss on launce...

I wish whoever had built the pier had thought to put another metre of concrete on top, as it became clear I'd have to evacuate before high tide, and I made my exit as the swells threatened to wash over the deck. I'll be back sometime, but it's one for a smaller tide and/or a flat calm day.

0 Comments

Sun

25

Sep

2016

Close but ...

I was hoping to fish for mullet near home today but a big swell running into Dunmanus and Bantry Bays and a strong westerly wind put paid to that. With rain forecast too I opted for the relative shelter of the Rosscarbery estuary.

 

I set up by the bridge arch on arrival, not the most sheltered swim but the only one offering much depth of water with the neap flood tide yet to arrive. I put out my two leger lines, put some additional groundbait out by catapult and sat back to watch the tips. All was quiet for an hour or so, as best as I could tell with the gusty wind waving the tips around. Maybe timid bites were passing by unnoticed but there was no missing what was going on when my right hand rod suddenly pulled over and locked down in the rest.

 

The mullet didn't seem that big at first but then got its head down in a series of short but powerful runs out and to the left - fortunately my left-hand line was out of the water being baited up when the fish took so no worries there. Eventually I was able to stop it and recover line little by little, till the fish was in the deep water in front of the bridge arch where it swam to-and-fro hugging the bottom. I was acutely aware of losing a big mullet in exactly the same circumstances a few weeks back, and this time the wind buffeting the rod around only added to my nerves ... but the hook held and eventually the mullet surfaced and I was soon able to net it.

 

I've not had a mullet over 6lbs in Ireland yet. I knew this one would be close, but the scales stopped at 5lb 14oz. Very happy with that but still waiting ...

I tried fishing on but the wind just seemed to be getting stronger and stronger. There were a few more inches of water in the pool now so I decamped round to the west shore where it was much more sheltered. The water was still shallow but the wind added wings to my casting and groundbaiting and I was able to fish well out from the wall.

 

It certainly wasn't a hectic session but I had four good pulls over the next couple of hours. Two of the mullet came adrift on the way in and the two I landed weighed in at 4lb 12oz and 4lb 4oz ...

0 Comments

Wed

21

Sep

2016

Fishing with Eddie

I drove down to Rosscarbery today to fish with Eddie Baker on the last full day of his holiday there. The tides were dropping away in height but I arrived on the high water which may have been somewhat wind-assisted by the strong southerly wind. Whatever - there was enough depth to float-fish along the west bank below the N71. Eddie was already fishing when I arrived, and had just landed a four-pounder. I had barely started fishing a few yards down from him when he struck into another good mullet, and after a long scrap he netted this 4lb 12oz thicklip ...

After that I started getting bites in my swim, though I was having trouble hitting them at distance and with a wind-bow in the line and, to be honest, being a bit rusty on the float-fishing after concentrating on legering recently. I was fishing just off bottom but I wasn't sure whether I was getting bites from sizable fish or from the small mullet I could see occasionally on the surface. Eventually I connected with this 3:14 which Eddie kindly netted as well as taking some pics ...

After only a few minutes I was getting bites again, and I must have been getting the hang of hitting them because after only missing two or three I was into a stronger fish that ran out before letting me bring it back ever-so slowly.

 

Eddie came down again to help me land the fish, as expected a bit bigger than the last one at 4lb 8oz.

 

The rain that had been spotting became more persistent, and soon it was raining steadily. We fished on and I could see Eddie missing occasional bites. Then suddenly he was into another fish, and the fight seemed to go on for ages. I was about to down tools and go to help him net it when my float slid away and I too was into a good fish. For a while we were both playing our fish at the same time, then Eddie landed his - the best of the day at 4lb 15oz - and mine soon followed, 4lb 1oz ...

Eddie packed up at this stage and went back up to his rented cottage to get dry. I fished on on the float for a half hour or so but could only raise a couple of isolated bites that I missed.

 

The tide was dropping now and I was getting soaked by the rain, so I set up my leger rods and cast pop-up crust baits well out. I made up some groundbait and catapulted several balls out round my hookbaits, then sat back in my chair in the shelter of the raised tailgate of my car.

 

It was quiet for an hour, quite surprising but also quite welcome as I got to munch my lunch in peace. Then my right hand rod tip gave a couple of nods and I struck into a decent fish. It was a slightly odd fight in which the fish came in half-way quite easily, gave an unusual salmon-type leap, then several bouts of surface head-shaking as it came gradually closer in. I wasn't all that surprised when it finally threw the hook just outside netting range - pity, a good fish that may have just gone 5lbs.

 

No great matter; on the very next cast I was in again on the same rod, and this time the fish felt more firmly attached. As I was playing it, Eddie hove into view it - it had more or less stopped raining - and he took some pics of me playing the fish then helped me land it. It was very similar in size to the one I'd lost, and weighed in at 4lb 14oz ...

As I sat chatting to Eddie, attention switched to my left-hand rod which was fishing further out. I missed one good pull-round then hooked a fish that came off after a few seconds. The rain started getting heavier again, and Eddie went back up to the cottage before he got soaked for the second time. I hooked another decent mullet on the left-hand rod which came off half-way in. Then another was briefly on then off. 

 

It seemed like I could carry on getting bites and losing fish all day, but I decided to call a halt soon after 3 p.m. and went up for a cuppa (or two) with Eddie and his wife Suzanne, thanks both of you.

 

Eddie had enjoyed some great fishing on his holiday. Over three weeks he'd landed 44 sizable mullet of which all but three were over 3lb 8oz ... there are swarms of sub-1lb mullet in the estuary but it's a bit of a mystery where the 1lb and 2lb class fish have gone. Eddie had landed lots of 4s and incredible 17 fish (I think) over the Irish specimen weight of 5lbs including two 6s of 6:02 and 6:04. It's been a pleasure fishing with him and I hope he and Suzanne will be back again in future.

Eddie with his 6lb 2oz thicklip
Eddie with his 6lb 2oz thicklip
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Sun

18

Sep

2016

Near Home

I don't get that many mullet from the bays near our home. They are rather exposed to southerly and westerly winds and the water colours up quite quickly if it's windy or if there's been heavy rain - and even when the conditions are right, there's no guarantee of finding the mullet as they tend to be pretty nomadic along this section of coast. And even then there's no guarantee the fish will feed on bread as they often seem to obsess with whatever small creatures they forage out from among the bladderwrack.

 

Anyway, circumstances converged in a positive way today as I found a little group of fish feeding in a shallow gully. I manoeuvred my way into position without scaring them and was getting sporadic bites within fifteen minutes or so of starting loose-feeding, fishing about 18 inches deep on light float tackle.

 

This fish was probably the smallest present - 2lbs on the nail - and I hooked another slightly larger soon after only to have it throw the hook.

 

Then the spring tide flooded over the rocks that formed one side of the gulley, the mullet disappeared and the chance was gone.

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Sat

17

Sep

2016

Back on the Rocks

I've been stuck in a bit of a mullet rut recently, and decided it was time for a change today. So I grabbed a bag of heads left from a mackerel-bash last evening, and headed to a favourite rock mark on the north coast.

 

It was, literally, a bite-a-chuck session. My first few casts disappointed a little as the bites materialised into a series of chunky LSDs, but then I was encouraged by a small bullhuss about 4lbs and then what felt a decent huss let go half way in. I then had a spell of about an hour in which I landed three huss of good size between 8lbs and 11lbs and a single strap conger. After that it went quieter with longer waits for bites that produced more LSDs and smaller huss. I packed up about high water, more-or-less out of bait.

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Tue

13

Sep

2016

Steve's Week

My good friend Steve Smith arrived on Tuesday 6th September for a week of mullet fishing. Steve has had a dreadful year with illness since his trip over last September, but looks to be on the mend again. It was good to see him out and fishing again, albeit a little rusty after his lay-off. His flight into Cork was delayed so the planned afternoon session became a 90 minute evening session.

 

We went to the spot near Castletownshend where I'd seen the mullet yesterday. It  was even foggier this time. The mullet were there again in some force, but in the end we didn't catch. We had a few knocks and pulls on our quivertips, but couldn't really tell if these were proper bites or just fish bumping into the line.

On Wednesday we headed for a rock mark on the north coast of the Sheep's Head to fish the dropping tide. We had a slightly delayed start while I sorted out another float rod for Steve, the tip ring having fallen apart on the one he'd made up earlier. Soon after we started loose-feeding, we started to see mullet swirling in the swim and taking odd pieces of floating bread.

I gave Steve first shot at these fish, but although they hung around for the best part of an hour, they seemed finnicky feeders and Steve could only muster three or four takes, all missed.

 

After a while the mullet moved on, and although we both fished patiently at various depths we couldn't muster any interest except from occasional small coalfish. Then around low water, suddenly we had mullet back in the swim. We both missed bites fishing a few feet deep, until I hooked one on about my sixth or seventh strike. It was a decent fish but came off after a minute or so, and our swim was dead again.

 

It was a good half hour before I started getting bites again, fishing deep. We weren't seeing any signs of mullet, and I thought maybe coalfish or wrasse were responsible. I bumped one fish on the strike, stopping the bites again, then just when we were thinking of packing up as the new tide was threatening to wash us off our rock, I struck into a powerful fish.

 

It didn't feel at all right for a mullet, diving repeatedly for the kelp reef out and to our right and feeling a heavy dead-weight when I managed to recover a little line. My money was on a big wrasse, but eventually a big white belly appeared below us and I winched up the mullet, neatly hooked in its underside. What a pity - it was a good fish too, it would have been my best this year from this mark had it been fairly hooked.

On Thursday we headed for Rosscarbery that had been fishing so well recently for myself and for Eddie Baker who had been fishing there over the past week. We found Eddie on arrival and Steve went with him to float-fish the high tide on the west bank where Eddie had been getting most of his fish, including his 6:02. I decided to let the visitors have the prime spots to themselves and took my leger rods over to the grassy bank by the bridge arch where I'd lost that big fish on Monday evening.

 

Eddie had already been float-fishing this spot this morning and had only had interest from small mullet, so I cast well out and groundbaited by catapult. I was soon getting knocks and had a couple of decent mullet out in the first hour, 3lb 15oz and 3lb 14oz ...

Next I was into a much bigger fish that streamed line out then found a snag in the middle of the pool. I tried giving it slack line, which it took but didn't free itself. After several repeats I eventually found myself playing just the snag and pulled for a break.

 

I'd seen Eddie playing a fish but no action in Steve's swim, and while I was retackling he came over to join me. Their float-fishing had been spoiled by hoardes of tiny mullet; Eddie had changed over to leger and promptly had a 5:09. Steve set up on leger next to me but unfortunately he'd missed the best of the action. With the tide now dropping, I had just one last bite, a 3:11 as it turned out. Eddie turned up just in time to take some photos of my playing it ...

It was raining lightly now. I left Steve fishing hopefully and went with Eddie up to his rented cottage for a cuppa, then to buy some lunch for Steve and me. Unfortunately while I was away the rain became much heavier; I arrived back to find Steve sheltering in the bike shed of the hotel across the road, just a bit damp. We got damper still packing our gear away and into the car. The rain eased off again while we sat in the car eating. We didn't fancy the exposed swim by the bridge again, so we parked down the road on the more sheltered west bank and fished a rod each out of the back of the car. There wasn't a great lot of water left and it was quiet, apart from one twitchy bite on my line which resulted in another 3:15 ...

We packed up after that, more than a bit disappointed that Steve was still blank.

 

Friday was a dreadful day with strong winds and several hours of heavy rain. We went into Bantry to do some shopping in the late afternoon and by the time we were  home it was brightening up. We settled for a quick mackerel session on one of our local piers. Steve caught some chunky mackerel on float-fished sandeel while I caught more but smaller on a shrimp rig, also some small pollack and scad as the light faded. It was nice to see Steve catching anyway ...

Saturday we headed to an estuary mark south and west of us. It had fished well earlier in the year but had been disappointing recently. I was hoping some mullet would have moved in since my last visit but in hindsight perhaps it wasn't the greatest choice for this very neap tide.

 

There were fish moving around in the deeper pool we fished but most if not all were small. It was very slow with just a few tentative bites that may have been mullet, but probably not big ones. My only better bite yielded this pretty little brown trout.

 

Later on we moved to the rock mark we'd fished on Wednesday. The worst of yesterday's wind had abated but it was still fresher than ideal and pushing our floats through the swim a little quicker than we would have liked. The only bites yielded small coalfish, pollack and a couple of wrasse.

Sunday we had arranged to fish at Rosscarbery then have a meal in the pub there with Eddie, his wife Suzanne and my wife Sylvi. The water was very low when we arrived and there was a strong southerly wind blowing straight up the estuary. Although it would mean fishing with the wind in our faces, the best immediate chance of getting Steve a mullet seemed to lie in legering from the grass by the bridge arch. We set up accordingly. I soon had a good pull round and a mullet of 3lb 7oz.

 

Then it went quiet for an hour before another good pull and a similar-sized fish that threw the hook after a few seconds. This turned out to be a blessing in disguise as no sooner had I cast out again than the rod pulled over strongly and I found myself playing a much stronger fish. It ran out powerfully but not far enough to find that snag again, and after a while Steve netted a thicklip of 5lb 6oz for me. At some stage in its life it had lost most of its first dorsal spine and the tip of the top lobe of its tail, but it was all healed up nicely ...

Meanwhile Steve had had not a touch. He was struggling to get any casting distance into the headwind, and this may have been telling with the water close in very coloured. Eddie was about again, he had had three mullet from the tidal lagoon before we had arrived and added another while we were fishing. Steve and Eddie went for a cuppa up at Eddie's cottage, I stayed fishing but the swim didn't produce at all after high water. So when Steve got back we packed up and went for another cuppa!

 

Refreshed, we decided to head out for another go, this time along the west bank which would be more sheltered. There was more depth than might have been the case on the neap tide, apparently helped by the strong wind. Even so, I think Steve's casting distance again worked against him. He had one half-hearted bite that didn't develop, whereas fishing further out I had two good takes and fish of 4:01 and 3:14. Eddie didn't fish this session but he did arrive with his camera and took some action shots.

Desperate measures for desperate times ... on Monday we visited a tidal pond in Glengarriff. It is usually a banker in terms of finding a few mullet and in that respect it didn't disappoint.

 

Steve set up some light float tackle and was getting bites straightaway. He missed several before connecting with one, though the immediate thrill of his rod bending over was quickly tempered by the realisation that it would be lucky to make 8oz weight. 

 

Still, it was a pretty little fish and, clearly on a roll, Steve was quickly into another one but slightly smaller ...

After that we moved onto the Beara peninsula but despite finding a peachy-looking swim in Castletownbere we couldn't raise a mullet. We called into the Sheep's Head rock mark we'd fished on Wednesday and Saturday on the way home. The conditions were the best we'd had there, but the mullet simply weren't there either. All very frustrating.

 

Tuesday - Steve's last fishing day. We headed south-east to fish areas where at least we knew there were mullet around. We started in Casteltownshend village and drew a complete blank - not a mullet sighted in a previously reliable swim. We relocated to the other side of the creek and the mark we'd fished on Steve's arrival last Tuesday. We found plenty of mullet there but they still weren't in a feeding mood; at least they weren't feeding on bread. I'll really have to give this mark some more attention when time allows as there are some good fish present. And so on back to the Last Chance Saloon at Rosscarbery. 

 

The tide was still on the neap side and in contrast to Sunday we were more-or-less becalmed. Having fished its nuts off for weeks Rosscarbery decided to disappoint as Steve, Eddie and I fished four hours for just one decent bite between us. I'd have given anything for it to have come to Steve's rod, but it came to mine. Steve did the honours with the net after a good scrap: 4lb 3oz.

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Mon

05

Sep

2016

Moving Around

I started today at the wonderful Lough Hyne near Skibbereen. I arrived on the morning high tide and could immediately see lots of mullet finning on the surface on either side of my chosen spot. I floatfished over the drop off from the shallow nearside shelf into the depths of the Lough. Considering how many mullet were around, bites were relatively few and far between, but when they came they were quite positive and over about 90 minutes I had four mullet out. Slightly disappointingly they were all less than 2lbs, although there were clearly some bigger fish around. 

 

As the tide began to drop, bites more or less dried up. Then as I was on the verge of knocking off, I had one last good bite and I was into a better fish, only 3lb 5oz but they always fight above their weight in the clear, deep water.

It's a pity the fantastic scenery was lost in the West Cork weather! By the time I'd returned the fish the first of the day's kayakers and swimmers had appeared. It seemed a good time to move on.

 

Next spot was further east, a new mark I'd found on Google Earth in the Castletownshend creek. The fog had really closed in by the time I got there, but I could see some fish moving over shallow mudflats beyond the fringe of bladderwrack. I set up my leger rods and fished for about 90 minutes till the fog turned to steady rain. I'd had a few knocks and little drop-backs on the tips but nothing had held on, I thought maybe they were only line bites. To be honest I hadn't had the best of the tide, just the tail end of the ebb. Overall I thought it looked a promising spot for the future and I could see a lot of other fishing potential nearby.

 

I decided to head east again to Rosscarbery planning to fish out of the back of the car given the weather, but by the time I got there the rain had eased off to an intermittent drizzle so I set up on the grass area close to the bridge arch. It was a relatively quiet session by recent standards, with just two good takes on the leger rods. First off was a 4:09 on my right-hand rod ...

That was a good scrap but no match for the fish that pulled my left-hand rod over about an hour later, just as I was contemplating packing up. The mullet streamed line off as it ran straight out, coming worringly close to a pole sticking out of the mud across the far side of the pool. Then it kited left, from where I was gradually able to work it nearer through the flow out of the lagoon. The fish got its head down into the deeper water in front of the bridge arch, and spent five minutes or more boring down towards the rocks beneath. And then the hook came out ... I'd not seen the fish at all, just a couple of massive whelms on the surface. It felt far stronger than any of the fives I had in August and I was left feeling I'd lost a real beast.

 

Eddie Baker, who is staying at Rosscarbery on holiday, arrived in time to see the second half of the fight and share my disappointment. Eddie's only been over a few days but has already enjoyed some great fishing including a 6:02 PB and several other 5lb+ thicklips ... looking forward to heading back with another friend, Steve Smith, who is arriving tomorrow to stay with us.

 

 

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Wed

31

Aug

2016

Just Local

We arrived back in Ireland yesterday and I had some sorting out to do in the garden today, so a brief local session in the early evening suited.

 

I headed to this shallow gully on the shore about a mile from our house and arrived at about high tide. It has been a fairly reliable producer of mullet in the past but last autumn a flash flood through the stream that feeds into the gully rearranged the topography somewhat and it has seemed less attractive to the mullet since. I nearly didn't fish today. A brief recce revealed nothing till I turned away to leave and thought I saw a variation in the ripple that may have been a fish just subsurface. I watched a while longer and saw it again. I wasn't convinced, but it was enough to make me go and fetch my tackle from the car.

 

I fished from the shingle in the foreground and was getting bites straightaway - stabby little bites that were barely strikeable. I hit those that held the float under slightly longer but missed time and time again. Finally on about the 20th strike I connected - a scrappy little thicklip of 2lb 4oz. I'd forgotten to put the camera in my bag today so no pic unfortunately.

 

I fished again. Bites were now much scarcer. I missed a couple more. I tried out on the rocks that form the left side of the gully so I could get to some slightly deeper water, where I missed a couple more bites. Eventually it became clear that whatever fish had still been present had now gone on the ebbing tide. I packed up wishing I'd arrived a little earlier.

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Sun

28

Aug

2016

Away Days at Christchurch

I've been over in England this week visiting family and friends. It has been a pretty hectic schedule but I'd left time to fish Christchurch for two mornings on the weekend of the National Mullet Club's National Rover fish-in.

 

The tide timings weren't great with an 8 a.m. high water yesterday, on Rover Saturday. I was out and fishing by 6.30 a.m., specifically legering at Grimbury Point with one rod fishing the edge of the main river channel slightly to my left and one fishing further into Grimbury Bay slightly to my right. 

 

All was quiet till just before high water when I had a couple of healthy plucks on the left hand tip. I struck and found myself playing a small mullet. The fight had a slightly different feel from normal and I had an inkling what this fish was before seeing it clearly - a lovely little golden grey of 1lb 9oz, a rare capture this far up Christchurch Harbour, especially mixing with the coarse fish on a neap tide when the water is almost fresh.

There wasn't long to wait for the next bite; about ten minutes later I was off again on the same rod as I struck into a gentle drop-back. This was a much stronger fish and gave a good scrap all the way in and after a few minutes I landed a well-proportioned thicklip of 3lb 8oz ...

Now mostly I've come to regard thinlips as a bit of a nuisance at Christchurch, where they have acquired a taste for the bread baits intended for much bigger thicklips. Yet now I found myself really wanting to catch one to complete my mullet-slam of all three species in one session. Everything was quiet for an hour till the ebb tide started to pick up strength, and my right hand rod fishing in the bay suddenly heeled over. This one came in easily then fought it out in the edge - typical thinlip behaviour - and it did indeed prove to be a thinlip, a respectable one at 3lb 2oz ...

So I'd got a mullety full house of goldie, thicklip and thinlip with my first three fish of the day ...

Half an hour later, the water level was dropping noticeably. I had a drop-back bite on my right hand rod and struck into a much more powerful fish than any of the previous. Soon it had moved out of the bay into the river channel where it made full use of the ebb flow. When I first glimpsed the thicklip I thought it was not that much larger than the 3:08 I had earlier, but when I finally drew it into the edge after about ten minutes and tried to pick it up, I realised how thick it was across the back and how deep. I began to think maybe it was a "six" but the scales settled out at 5lb 8oz ...

After this I started getting rattly bites and landed a few dace. I could have stuck it out and fished the low water and start of the flood at Grimbury but I decided instead to move about 400 yards down the Harbour to a spot that sometimes fishes well over the LW slack. As it turned out it wasn't hectic. I missed one good pull and landed two further mullet, a chunky 5:00 on the last of the ebb and a little 2:05 on the first of the new flood tide ...

Today, on Rover Sunday, I intended fishing a shallow creek further down the Harbour with Alan Butterworth. Alan had also had a decent Saturday landing three 3lber thicklips at Lymington but losing two bigger fish under the pontoons. But when we arrived at the car park this morning we were greeted by a stiff south-west wind and rain threatening. We decided on Grimbury again so we could get our backs to the weather (in my case behind a brolly - Alan is made of sterner stuff clearly.) I let Alan have my favourite swim that I fished yesterday, and set up a few yards to his right fishing further into Grimbury Bay.

 

It was a slowish start again but before too long I heard a "yesss" to my left and looked out from under my brolly to see Alan into a fish. It was a nice little thicklip of 3lb 10 oz ...

Soon after there was a little feeding flurry in front of me, with three good pulls in quick succession all on my left-hand rod. Unfortunately only the middle one hung on, the other two fish both throwing the hook well into their fight. The last one felt a bit better than the one I landed, a chunky 3:06 ...

Then I lost another fish; this one wrenched my right-hand rod over in a fierce take that bent out the Kamasan B983 hook! We had a quiet spell after that then Alan and I were both into fish almost simultaneously, Alan's a 3:12 thicklip and mine a 4:01. It was quiet after that as we began to run out of water in the bay. Then a final take for me on my right-hand rod that, in keeping with my day, came off about two thirds of the way in. We packed up about midday.

 

I was pleasantly surprised by the numbers of fish about: I had six mullet yesterday of which four were thicklips and with better luck could have had another six today (all thicklips, I think.) Clearly Christchurch is still capable of providing good sport, so it's slightly surprising and a little disappointing to see how lightly it is being fished at the moment. I had the place to myself fishing-wise yesterday and today Alan and I shared it briefly only with a couple of (unsuccessful) thinlip spinners.

 

The place seems to have been largely deserted by serious mullet anglers. It's difficult to know why, but the ticket prices now £8 per day or £70 per year don't help and undoubtedly the fishing has declined from its peak due to the pernicious level of legal netting in the lower parts of the Harbour and some illegal netting higher up. A particularly bad incident occurred in April 2014 when a netting gang up from Plymouth were caught in the act but over 2 tonnes of prime mullet were dead in their net. Certainly the chance of a really big thicklip is now much reduced ... it was 2009 that I caught my 9:03 PB that brought to an end a run of six 8lb+ fish over four seasons.

 

Those were good days but I'll always being happy catching 3, 4, 5lb mullet with an outside chance of something larger. I hope to be back at Christchurch before too long.

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Sat

20

Aug

2016

Last Trip with Mick

I have to travel back to England tomorrow for a week and Mick will have moved on in his tour of Ireland by the time I'm back ... so one last session together today.

 

Mick had blanked after I left on Wednesday, and was unlucky to lose two big fish in the lagoon at Rosscarbery on Thursday, but he had four out from the estuary yesterday including a 5:02 and was clearly on a roll as he had a fish on the bank before I'd even tackled up today ...

That one was a shade under 4lbs. In fact Mick was off on a stormer of a session and he was into his fifth mullet of the day before I had my first bite some two hours later.

 

We were fishing on the west bank because it was blowing a gale with intermittent flurries of rain in the wind. I was fishing about a hundred yards to Mick's right in a slightly shallower swim, with two leger rods out in the lee of my car.

 

When my chance came it was this fish of 2 lb 14oz and I followed it up a few minutes later with one of 2:13. 

 

After that there was a bit of a lull until I had a good pull on my left hand rod. The fish didn't really run but came in quite easily about half way then chugged around. It seemed a strong fish and occasionally it stuck its large tail out. The line picked up a small branch that had blown off one of the trees behind me, and this complicated the fight somewhat as I couldn't always keep a direct line to the mullet. Still, it hung on and Mick came down to help me net it. It was a superbly conditioned 5:04 ...

... but the dog didn't seem all that impressed.

 

I'd come back to 5-3 at this stage and before long it was 5-4 with an almost repeat performance of the bite and fight (though minus the branch) on the same rod. Another lovely thicklip, this time 5:09 ...

That was my fifth five-pounder of the season. As I returned it I noticed Mick into another fish and that made it 6-4 for the session as we called it a day soon after with the water draining from the pool, the wind picking up even more and the rain becoming more persistent.

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Wed

17

Aug

2016

More at Rosscarbery

Back at Rosscarbery today to fish with Mick after we'd failed to contact the mullet on a Sheep's Head rock mark yesterday - though we had a bit of fun later on catching mackerel on light tackle.

 

I arrived after lunch to find the pool below the N71 very low but well populated by mullet, most of which seemed to be cruising around with little sign of feeding. Mick wasn't there yet so I dropped into the swim where I'd done so well last week and started off trotting a float down the flow of water coming through the bridge arch.

 

30 minutes later, without a bite, I was changing over to my leger rods to fish further out. Mick arrived and set up to my right. The first hour legering was quiet apart from one pull-round that may well have been a line-bite. But as the flood tide arrived and the water level began to edge up, I started getting a few trembles and knocks on the tips and eventually three good bites which yielded at hat-trick of four-pounders at 4:03, 4:07 and 4:01 ...

Mick meanwhile hadn't had a touch! I really didn't want this to turn into another whitewash for him so as there was now a better choice of swims with the increased depth, I went off to try a spot I fancied on the west shore of the pool and suggested Mick move across into my swim.

 

Best laid plans and all ... my new chosen spot was choked with rafts of lettuce weed so after a couple of casts I moved back and set up again in the swim Mick had vacated. He was still fishless and had changed to floatfishing as the tide was now pouring through the bridge arch into the lagoon, and more lettuce weed was drifting through. I tried on the float too but neither of us could get a bite. So as the flow began to ease up as the lagoon filled, out went the legers again. And the inevitable happened I suppose ...

 

After two or three casts I had a trembly sort of bite on one rod. Nothing came of it but after I'd put on a new piece of crust I made a real effort to cast the bait back to the same spot, and after a couple of minutes the trembly bite repeated. My hand went down to strike this one but the rod pulled over anyway as I reached it. It was a strong fish that moved off powerfully to the middle of the pool then put up a stubborn if not over-protracted fight before Mick could net it.

 

It was a tatty old fish with split dorsal and pectoral fins and what looked like tail-rot that had taken a good part of its tail area. The scales fluctuated between 5:15 and 6:00 so I did the honest thing and called it 5lb 15oz ... still my new Irish PB by an ounce so I'm pleased with that.

 

I left Mick still fishing, I really hope he caught.

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Mon

15

Aug

2016

Who Let The Dogs Out?

 

Disappointing couple of sessions to report.

 

Last evening on Bantry Airport Strand - it looked ideal for a thornback ray but the session tuned into a doggie-fest - not for the first time at that venue it has to be said.

 

Then today on a north coast rock mark - more of the same! It was a bite-a-chuck on big baits intended for conger and huss and I had several double shots like this on smaller baits.

 

When I managed to catch two on a single hook rig (when one hooked itself, shook the bait up the trace and another one gorged it down) I thought it was time to give it best. I put on some mackerel feathers and salvaged the session with a dozen mackerel for tea and future-bait.

 

I'm away back in UK for a while shortly - hope the dogs will have thinned out by the time I'm back.

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Sat

13

Aug

2016

Perfection in Miniature

What a difference three days makes.

 

Saw hundreds of mullet today but all juveniles from fry up to about herring size. I mostly fished down in the water hoping there might be one or two bigger fish lurking beneath. But the only bites suggested micro-mullet and eventually I hooked this scale-perfect specimen, one of the smallest I've ever had on rod and line ...

And this was bound to happen sooner or later. My first ever Irish bass, caught on bread and not much bigger than the mullet ...

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Wed

10

Aug

2016

Five a Day at Rosscarbery

I fished with Mick Buckley today at Rosscarbery. It was a very neap tide that had not yet started to flood; the best bet seemed the slightly deeper water close to the bridge arch on the N71 bank of the pool below the causeway. We could see many mullet breaking surface with their backs and fins a fair distance out. We set up leger rods to fish the pop-up crust baits that have been so successful for me this year.

First off was my right hand rod - the middle of the three we were fishing between us - which pulled over after a minute or so on its very first cast. The fish splashed on the surface immediately and clearly wasn't very large by Rosscarbery standards. After a game little scrap I landed it and it weighed in at 2lb 3oz.

 

There was a lengthy lull in proceedings after that, though we could see fish moving all

round our baits and were getting occasional knocks and pulls that may well have been line bites.

 

Then my right hand rod was off again, a repeated pull that seemed to be getting stronger and stronger till I struck. A much more powerful fish this one, 4lb 6oz as it turned out. After another but shorter lull, a real belter of a bite on my left hand rod. This one ran out strongly and repeatedly and took over ten minutes to land, it weighed 4lb 11oz. My two 4s ...

Mick had a good bite at this stage but his strike didn't connect properly and the fish was gone in a splash and a whelm. A quiet spell was ended by a lunging bite on my right hand rod, and the mullet ploughed out into the middle of the pool. It seemed a better fish than those previous so I took it steady and Mick netted it nearly a quarter of an hour later. It went 5lb 10oz on my scales, my second biggest of the season, well pleased ...

The next lull was broken by a good pull on my right hand rod, but the fish came off after a couple of seconds. Soon I was in again on the same rod, and this fish held on. My fifth mullet of the day weighed 3lb 10oz.

 

Five mullet in a day is a great result anywhere, my joy was tempered only by the thought that Mick had blanked. He'd had just one decent bite, the same I'd had on my left hand rod. Five good bites and four fish had come on my right hand rod fishing in the middle of the three. It's inexplicable really, the baits were fishing only a few yards apart and we could see fish moving all around the area from time to time. Just luck of the draw I guess. Mick takes a decent photo and I hope I'll be able to reciprocate for him next time we are out.

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Mon

08

Aug

2016

Fishing with Mick

I fished today with an old friend from the National Mullet Club, Mick Buckley, who has recently retired and is on an extended fishing tour of Ireland. I can't even remember the last time I saw Mick, it may well have been on a trip to Alderney in 1989! He came to see us for the day, leaving his highly impressive trailer home on a site near Skibbereen.

 

After the blow yesterday afternoon and evening I was concerned the rocks here would be unfishable, but the swell had gone down quickly leaving a difficult but fishable choppy sea. I wasn't sure either the mullet would have hung around during the rough weather, and it did indeed prove to be a day of few bites.

 

About an hour after starting, and continual drip-feeding of mashed bread, my float finally dived under. I struck and instead of the pollack or coalfish I was expecting, a mullet came to the surface. It was only a small one 2lb 12oz but it was a start.

 

About an hour later I missed a similar bite. At least there was another fish around and a few minutes later, it found Mick's bait. It was a fish similar in size to mine. Mick played it for a couple of minutes and then it came off.

 

Half an hour later, a repeat performance ... I missed a bite, and Mick hooked the fish a few minutes later. This one stayed attached and was a bit bigger - Mick didn't weight it but it I'd think it was over 3lbs. 

That was around low water. We stayed another hour or so of the flood tide but had no more bites. It was a slowish session overall but at least we both caught - can't be bad.

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Sun

07

Aug

2016

Blown Off

This was a pretty forgettable session to be sure. It was forecast windy so I chose an estuary mark south-west of us. On arrival in the early morning it was slightly misty and more-or-less calm, and I could see some fish moving on the shallows below the road causeway. I set up my leger rods and started fishing.

 

Second cast in I had a persistent bite and hooked a decent but obviously not huge mullet that turned out to be a long and lean 2lb 14oz ...

I'd hooked the fish in its bottom lip but looking at the close-up pic afterwards, I wonder if that's an old hook scar in the middle of its top lip and if so if it's a previous capture of mine?

 

While I'd been playing the mullet in I'd seen a couple of pulls on my other rod. They came to nothing but it looked like a good day might be on the cards. Not to be as it happened: the sky had cleared and the wind was picking up by the minute, soon there was an impossible cross-wind and breaking waves running up the estuary. I relocated to the relative shelter of the deep pool above the road bridge and spent 90 minutes trotting a float through to no avail. I had neither a bite nor saw a mullet, and the water stirred up in the shallow parts of the lagoon was colouring the pool badly as it moved down on the ebb. Enough of this I thought and packed up.

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Fri

05

Aug

2016

Stocking Up

Encouraged by those mackerel earlier in the week, I went back to the same mark today for the evening high water. 

 

The mission was to catch a few mackerel to eat and then more to stock the freezer with bait for the autumn.

 

The Atlantic was rather restless with the start of a groundswell from a gale due to pass north of us over the weekend. But the mackerel were present in numbers and feeding well.

 

Whereas on the last trip it was mostly just odd fish, today they were coming out in twos, threes and fours.

 

I stopped at 31 after less than an hour fishing; it was about as many as I could stand processing in one go.  

 

Job done, I sat a while to enjoy a spectacular sunset as the sun dipped behind the cloud over the Beara peninsula.

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Wed

03

Aug

2016

Back to Rosscarbery

It's been a while since I'd been down at Rosscarbery and I've been out of touch with how it's fishing. But a new guy, Martin, on the Chelon labrosus forum posted this week that he'd been there recently and had a 6 and a 5 and some smaller mullet - it seemed like time to head back.

 

I started in the lagoon float-fishing. It soon became clear there were huge shoals of tiny mullet in there. They were very quick into the groundbait and onto my hookbait. After 30 minutes of almost constant dink bites on the float, but nothing remotely strikeable, I decided this was a waste of time. I moved over the road and wasted some more time trying to fish the edge of the stream of water exiting the lagoon - it was really far too windy for effective float fishing and I saw not a sign of a mullet.

I headed down the road on the west side of the estuary and eventually found some decent size mullet in the shallows.

 

There wasn't enough depth to floatfish sensibly so I set up my two leger rods to fish pop-up crust baits and cast them out. I catapulted some groundbait around my hookbaits.

 

Action was slow coming but when it came it was decisive. One second the quivertip on my left hand rod was moving gently with the breeze, the next the rod was bent over and threatening to pull over the wall.

 

No need to strike at all. The fish powered out and put up a good fight for five minutes or so till the line picked up some lettuce weed that slid down and covered the mullet's head. That quietened it down a bit!

 

I soon had it out and weighed, a particularly handsome specimen of 4lb 6oz. I returned it, baited up both rods and cast out again.

Photo by Patrick Lombard
Photo by Patrick Lombard

It was slow again, but I was still seeing a few fish in the swim and a few casts later I had a much slower pull round on the same rod.

 

This fish came in quite easily, then decided to put up a fight and motored off out and right, crossing my other line but luckily not tangling with it.

 

Eventually I brought it back and netted it. Someone had stopped their van to watch and as I unhooked the fish they introduced themselves as Patrick Lombard.

 

Pat has persuaded IFI to set up a National Grey Mullet Programme to better understand the species and that (hopefully) may to lead to conservation measures. The first stage is some scale sample research. My sampling kit was still in the post but while I weighed the mullet - 4lb 2oz - Pat readied his kit and did the honours measuring length and girth and taking five or six scales from one flank. The mullet went back not too much the worse for wear.

My swim now seemed empty of fish but I carried on for another hour or so; no more bites.

 

I saw some fish moving close to the wall to my left so I took my float rod down to have a go. They seemed fairly undisturbed by my presence but uninterested in bread and they may even have been some of the thin lips that turn up at Rosscarbery.

 

After an hour I decided to relocate my leger kit further left still to a small grassy island.

 

My arrival coincided with the first flush of the new tide into the pool. I'm not sure if it was this or my move that got things going again. It certainly wasn't hectic but over the next couple of hours I had quite a few twitches on both rods and four good takes. I contrived to lose the first two fish. One I played probably too hard trying to keep it away from some snags to my left, and the hook came out just as I seemed to have it coming towards me. Predictably I eased up on the next one and it found one of the snags; I found myself playing a length of heavy duty rope part-buried in the mud. After that, things went better and I landed the 3:08 above and then a 3:00.

 

Bites dried up about high water. I spent a last hour on the float as I had seen several fish whelming close in - but to no effect.

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Sun

31

Jul

2016

Mackerel ... and Shark?

This session came about by accident. I'd been onto a south coast mark after pollack, and although I'd found plenty they were all disappointingly small. There was a fresh southerly wind and the swell got up before high water cutting the session short. I headed instead for a north coast mark, stopping in at home for a cuppa on the way.

 

I was set up and fishing again soon after high water. The pollack were again playing hard to get, with just a couple of small ones taking the redgill over the first hour. Then a mackerel latched on, and it seemed a good cue to change over to a shrimp rig.

 

I had eight more mackerel in ones and twos. Not great numbers but they were decent size, around a pound each. They were down deep and I could only find them with a very slow retrieve; fortunately the bottom is quite clear on this mark till close in.

 

 

At one stage a mackerel was grabbed and torn from the hook, about half way in and still deep. It could have been anything, including one of the big pollack I'd come for, so I didn't give it a lot more thought. About twenty minutes later I was winding in a double shot. As they came close to the rocks I became aware of a large shape behind and beneath them, following them in. It turned away about 15 yards out, leaving me with a glimpse of a big, pale flank and a massive boil on the surface.

 

Now I've had seals chase bull huss in to the rocks before, but this looked different and anyway I didn't see a seal around today either before or after. Having watched a video on Facebook of two anglers playing a porbeagle shark in to the rocks recently in West Wales, I'm convinced this is what I saw. I wonder if they're regular visitors? And more to the point, is it worth the investment in some specialist gear that might give me a fighting chance of getting one in?

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Sat

30

Jul

2016

Duck Broken

I first fished this swim in August 2014 with Steve Smith. Steve had a nice 4lb thicklip and I missed a few good takes until bumping a fish off on the strike. Next visit wasn't until September 2015 ... more missed bites and another fish bumped. Yesterday evening I managed to lose two decent mullet, one when the hook length parted on the strike, one that came off after about a minute. So you can imagine I was pleased to actually land a mullet here this morning, albeit not the biggest ever ...

It's a nice swim, sheltered from a west wind but needing a bit of sunshine to bring the fish into the shallow water. Anyway, on a roll, I relocated a few yards and caught another mullet, even smaller! A pretty little fish, and bigger to follow I'm sure.

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Sat

23

Jul

2016

Mullet ... Wrasse

It seemed quite a nice day at home but down by the shore of Bantry Bay it was grey and blustery. Hope of a mullet seemed much diminished but I was desperate to get out after a busy few weeks of work so I was determined to give it a go. 

 

I fed mashed bread and floatfished and to my surprise was getting plenty of bites ... not mullet but ballan wrasse up to about 2lbs. I've noticed before they seem to go for the bread bait more readily when the water is more turbulent, and today they were really having it.

I fished a couple of hours down to low water, by which time it was pretty obvious no mullet were going to turn up. I prised a few limpets off the rocks to use for bait, thinking they might get a bigger wrasse. But no, just a couple more wrasse of similar size then a string of baby coalfish which for some reason hadn't wanted the bread today ...

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Sun

03

Jul

2016

Needed This

I've been grinding out the exam work over the past few weeks - and more of the same to come over the next few weeks - got to lunchtime today and thought, "I need a break from this."

 

I drove along the south coast of the Sheep's Head looking at likely mullet marks but at every one there seemed to be just that bit too much breeze and swell. It looked a struggle so in the event I headed off the peninsula and south-west to a small estuary where I've done well before.

 

The high tide was pouring through the bridge arch into the pool above the causeway. My normal swim looked impossible so I settled on legering over the sand flats on the other side of the road.

There didn't seem to be masses of mullet about but I had sporadic bites on pop-up crust baits over the next three hours till the tide dropped away too much. I hooked four ... one came off in the edge after a good scrap and I landed three of 3:08, 3:10 and 3:07. 

Needed that - feeling better - back to work now ...

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Wed

22

Jun

2016

Congers with Stu

Stu Read is an old friend of an old friend who was visiting SW Ireland with his wife Susie. They were staying local  to us at Ahakista for a few days after having spent a week or so in Kerry further north.

 

I arranged to take Stu fishing today, and was hoping some big bull huss would turn up.

 

Well, that wasn't to be, whether because of the bright sunshine we were blessed with or some other reason, and just one smallish and rather camera-shy individual showed an interest in our baits. Plus I had a couple of LSDs.

 

The lack of huss was partially compensated by a bit of a conger-fest, I think we had six or seven between us with Stu getting the most and the biggest. No monsters it has to be said, but an enjoyable session nonetheless.

 

Then home for a fish and chips supper.

 

 

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Tue

21

Jun

2016

Pollack - and Mackerel

Under orders today to catch a pollack or two for a meal with guests coming to dinner tomorrow! Conditions were less than ideal with a stiff SW breeze and a fair bit of swell pushing up the bay. It was all a bit borderline at my mark of choice, though I lost one good fish on a pink redgill before deciding the swell was too chancy. I relocated to a bigger headland a half mile or so further east, to get some shelter on its lee side. It was a bit of a scramble to get there but I was soon fishing again and to better effect.

 

I had a couple of small pollack out in short order, then a better one to keep about 4lbs (above) then another just slightly smaller (below.)

 

Then I lost the redgill in a snag. With job done and sea conditions still not great I was minded to pack up, but I decided to stay a little longer and tied on a pearl white redgill. After a few casts I was into another fish, but this one turned out to be my first mackerel of year. With the prospect of some fresh mackerel for tea and fresh bait for tomorrow, I quickly changed to a shrimp rig. Four or five casts later I must have landed it right in a mackerel shoal, as I had fish on as soon as I tightened up after the cast, and it turned out to be a full-house string of five mackerel. After that - not another sniff, so it must have just been small shoals passing through at speed.

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Sun

12

Jun

2016

Ignored in Dungarvan

I've been back in UK working for the past week. I managed a half day on the National Mullet Club fish-in at Lymington yesterday, and blanked, before heading for the ferry home last evening. This morning I stopped off at Dungarvan for a break on the drive back across Ireland, and found these mullet (and many others) around the boats and pontoons in the harbour ...

I couldn't resist getting my float rod out of the car and having a go ... but as I sort of knew would be the case, these fish weren't for catching in the mood they were in today. After 90 minutes of having every hook bait and free offering roundly ignored, I decided to get on my way again.

 

There were some clonking fish there. I'll next be passing through in August, so I'll have another shot then.

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Wed

01

Jun

2016

Mussel Power

Eight days later, the sun is still shining. And the wind has turned west - it's a pity I have work on now! I had to drive into Bantry this afternoon and I decided I could afford the time for an evening session from about half-tide down on the way home.

I chose a rock mark in Bantry Bay near a seafood processing plant.

 

I arrived to find a huge flock of gulls feeding on cooked mussels that were being dumped still with the flesh in the shells - I suppose they must have boiled up too many.

 

I helped myself to a few handfuls of free bait, then set up and started fishing. I fed mashed bread and started with bread on the hook. 

 

I had occasional bites over the first hour, some quite delicate that I suspected to be mullet, but the only bites I hit turned out to be small coalfish. Still there weren't too many of the little blighters about, it seemed a good time to try the mussel.

Whether it was the change of bait or just coincidence that a shoal turned up I don't know, but within a minute my float had slowly submerged and I was attached to a mullet. It wasn't huge, 2lb 6oz as it turned out, but it was the harbinger of better fish to come.

 

As I played it out in the clear water, it picked up multiple "followers", at times as many as a dozen, several looking substantially bigger than the hooked fish.

 

Unfortunately the only sizeable rock pool was more-or-less full of mussel shells. I returned the mullet as far along the rocks as I could reasonably manage, and said a little prayer it wouldn't swim back through the shoal and spook them. 

 

I needn't have worried. What followed next, down to low water at dusk, was a really enjoyable 90 minutes with regular bites and five more mullet hooked, all landed. In order they were 2:12, 4:06, 4:00, 3:08 and another 4:06 ... good to see some bigger fish on the rock marks here now, possibly back from spawning. The three four-pounders ...

 

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Tue

24

May

2016

Quick Rock Session

Work on and visitors staying so not much fishing at the moment. I managed to find the time today but it was always going to be a struggle in a strong easterly wind against a larger-than-expected swell off the Atlantic, and bright sunlight. I picked some limpets for bait and headed off to one of the few rock marks that would be sheltered.

I alternated between floatfishing the limpets for wrasse - all small as it turned out this early in the season - and spinning a redgill for pollack. There weren't many pollack about but I lost what felt a really good one when it dived into the kelp and then landed one about 4lbs that felt small by comparison. Towards high water the swells came up even more and I gave it best.

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Thu

19

May

2016

Slightly Unusual Mullet Session

It was a rough old day on the Sheep's Head with Atlantic swells pounding the rocks, so I decided to head for the calmer waters of an estuary on the Mizen peninsula.

 

I arrived at 4 p.m. which was about high tide, so there was a decent depth over the sand flats below the road causeway. There was a stiff breeze and small wavelets running up the estuary, so I decided it would be best to leger. I set up on a rocky outcrop of the west bank, and cast out two pop-up crust baits.

 

What was to be a slightly unusual session started ... unusually. On each of the first five casts I had twitchy little bites on the right-hand rod, while nothing registered at all on the left hand rod fishing an identical bait a few yards away. On the sixth cast, a mullet finally hung on and pulled the tip over on the right hand rod again. It was a lively fish though obviously not huge. It ran left, past the other line without tangling it. No sooner had I got to my feet and started shuffling after it than the tip on the other rod, the one that had remained motionless for something over an hour, started banging away! I shuffled back and loosened off the drag, then got on with landing the first fish. It was about 3lbs, I unhooked it and left it in the net in the shallows, then picked up the other rod and played in the mullet on that ... and netted it with the first mullet still in the bottom of the net. The new one was slightly smaller, 2:10 as it turned out and the first 3:00.

 

After the weighings and photo, I went back to the rods. First bait went out and, incredibly, the rod wanged over before I had even finished tightening the line. It was another mullet of similar size but it came off after half a minute or so.

 

After the instant action ... nothing ... neither tip moved for over an hour, apart from rebaiting obviously. I thought I'd had my lot but about 6:45 p.m. the left rod lunged over then sprang back without a hook-up. I'd intended packing up at 7:00 p.m. to get home in time for dinner, so I put out a "last cast." Nothing again. As the minute hand reached 12, I started to wind in the left hand rod ... and the right hand rod pulled over. Quick swap of rods and after a good scrap I had another mullet on the bank, 3:01. It was nearly 7:15 p.m. now but I just had to have another "last cast" - and no sooner had I put the rod in the rest and tightened the line than another mullet grabbed the bait. This fish seemed to have more weight about it and it did indeed prove to be the biggest of the day, though not by much at 3:07. Another "last cast"  ... this one proved quiet on both rods and with a drizzle setting in, 7:45 p.m. seemed a good time to call it a day.

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Wed

18

May

2016

Dogged Out

All dogged out at Bantry Airport Strand ... again! The place is alleged to produce bull huss and thornbacks; so far it's delivered me three blanks and two doggie-fests. Wondering if it's been over-hyped to be honest but I'll keep trying.

 

On the plus side ... a close encounter with an otter that came scurrying along the waterline and stopped in front of me sniffing out the scraps of used bait I'd been throwing down. It seemed not bothered at all about me sitting quietly a few feet away shining my head-torch on it, though it soon scarpered when a dog on its late night walk came along the beach behind.

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Mon

16

May

2016

New Rock Mark

This is a spot I've been meaning to try, near the end of Sheep's Head on the north side. It's recognised as a dangerous spot exposed to Atlantic swells, but today was very calm with only a slight swell after days of east wind. There'd never be a better time for a first look.

 

I fished the right hand rod quite close in with pop-up squid baits. I had bites most casts and landed two LSDs and three bull huss on this rod, the biggest huss around double figures. At worst the ground seemed broken - I only lost one set of gear in a snag plus one other lead when the rotten bottom did its job and I landed a huss.

 

I fancied the ground further out might be clean, so tried a standard pulley rig baited with sandeel and belted it well out. My hunch proved right, no snags and this bait also seemed to be more-or-less clear of the huss, with just one about 8lbs on the last cast. Before that I missed some interesting little bites - flatfish I wonder? - must try again with some smaller hooks. One tearaway bite resulted in my first pollack of the season, about 3lbs, which picked the sandeel up off the bottom. Shortly after another about the same size grabbed the sandeel as I was winding in. I finished off the session with a few casts with a redgill and added another pollack to the haul, about 4lbs.

 

It looks a promising mark for all manner of fishing - flats and rays maybe on the clean ground, bound to be some conger on the same ground as the huss, wrasse certainly close in and it will be interesting getting some groundbait in the water and seeing if it attracts mullet, gars, even trigger fish as found on the Beara across the Bay. Just need some calm days this summer ...

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Sat

14

May

2016

Rock Session

It was certainly a lovely morning to take the big rods out on the rocks, though the light easterly wind that had persisted several days now didn't inspire great confidence. No need to worry though, after a quiet half hour it became a bite-a-cast, mostly bull huss and a couple of LSDs thrown into the mix, and a few missed bites. Remarkably two of the huss came on tiny mackerel strip baits I was fishing on one rod. Three others fell to popped-up mackerel head and squid baits on the other rod. This included the biggest of the day, this fat creature just over 10lbs ...

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Thu

12

May

2016

Quieter Day

It was time for a return to the rock mark in Bantry Bay where I'd done so well with seven mullet in a session last week.

 

Any pretensions of a similar haul today were soon dashed. I took up exactly where I'd finished last week with a string of small coalfish that were whacking the float under. However, as the tide dropped away towards low water I started to get some more delicate and missable bites, and I wondered if a mullet or two may have moved into the swim. After a few more misses I was suddenly into a powerful fish that shot off down the tide then came up and splashed on the surface - a mullet!

 

After a good old scrap I slid the net under this one, a pristine 3lb 10oz ...

Alas, that was the end of the mullet action for the day. I had a couple of promising (missed) bites immediately after landing the one, then a longish quiet spell and then the coalfish hoard returned on the making tide.

 

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Tue

10

May

2016

Rosscarbery Return

Rosscarbery today! I arrived late morning at about high water. There was a good depth in the lagoon after several big spring tides, so I decided to make a start there.

 

An hour later, slightly deflated, I decided on a move. I'd only seen one mullet whelm and had only had one proper bite, which I'd missed, plus a few dinks and trembles on the float that may have been gobies or sandsmelt rather than mullet.

 

I headed down to the bottom of the tidal pool below the N71. It's been a kind swim to me this year, and once again there were mullet in residence. Despite the reasonable depth they seemed to be staying out from the wall, so I opted for legering with pop-up crust baits.

 

It was a slow start but I kept catapulting a couple of extra balls of groundbait out every cast, and eventually a pod of fish seemed to move over the carpet I was building up. I had three solid takes. The first fish came off about half way in, but I landed the other two. They were nothing spectacular in size but nice clean fish of 3:02 and 3:10 ...

After that the swim seemed to die. Rather than wait for the mullet to return, I moved back to the lagoon as I was really keen to get my first of the year out of there. I tried two different spots but alas to no avail, no definite bites at all.

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Thu

05

May

2016

Bantry Bay Mullet

There was a big swell running yesterday but this morning it had calmed off enough for a first mullet trip this year on the rocks on the Bantry Bay side of the Sheep's Head ... I was keen to give it a go before yet more northerly winds arrive for the weekend.

 

I set up a sliding float to fish bread flake about ten feet deep. I'd slightly over-shotted the float and it was struggling a little with the lop, but I thought I had bites on my first two trots through the swim. Then on the third trot, the float buried. I struck into a powerful fish that ran off parallel to the rocks on my right, worryingly close to the kelp, before coming out into open water. It turned out to be a very long and lean thicklip of 4lbs exactly with a great paddle of a tail.

 

Then followed a quiet hour or more as the last of the tide dropped away. Around low water I started to see occasional fish taking bits of bread off the surface, when the gulls didn't get it first. I shallowed the float up to fish about three feet deep and was soon into a succession of mullet over the next two hours. They were all much of a muchness in size ... 2:05, 3:00, 2:13, 2:11, 2:08, 2:00 but they provided plenty of bites and great fun. It was clear quite a big shoal was present as some of the hooked fish acquired several "followers" as I was playing them. As it was mostly overcast and not too warm, I placed the fish in a rock pool after unhooking them. I don't know if that helped keep the shoal in front of me as opposed to possibly spooking them returning fish into the swim, but at least the fish went back fit and rested at the end.

As the tide started to rise quickly, a shoal of small coalfish seemingly replaced the mullet.

 

In truth there was probably a good chance of picking up more mullet if I'd persisted and fished through the coalies, but it seemed as good a time as any to release the mullet in the rockpool and head for home.

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Tue

03

May

2016

Disappointed

Really quite a disappointing day ... I drove off the peninsula along the Dunmanus Bay shore, checking several shallow spots for mullet ... but the fish that were present last week were nowhere to be found. So I carried on to the south west and the estuary where I'd had good bags in March.

 

Clearly there were far fewer mullet present now, apart from large shoals of fingerlings. I did however have quite a few bites on float both above the road causeway and below when I tried a move to change my luck. I really should have caught more, but I only connected with two mullet, one very briefly as the trace parted just above the hook on the strike. The other was this slightly sorry specimen of 2lb 4oz and half its tail missing ... it fought surprisingly well considering.

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Sat

30

Apr

2016

Wind's in the West ...

Just a couple of short and blank mullet sessions since the last post, both in the shallows of Dunmanus Bay. There were plenty of mullet around for a while both times, but chasing each other and bow-waving around at speed, no real feeding activity. A cold north wind had persisted all week, and the water felt chilled despite good sunshine, definitely not helping.

 

Then today the wind was turned to west. I headed to a Bantry Bay rock mark with the big rods. On one I fished big pop-up baits either mackerel head or squid/mackerel cocktail. On the other, a two-hook paternoster with size 2 hooks baited with frozen lug and mackerel strip to see if there were any smaller fish about.

 

I had a dogfish out on the mackerel strip first cast, then surprisingly despite knocks and rattles most casts, nothing else hung on to the small hooks.

 

Meanwhile, a missed run on a mackerel head, then a dogfish on the same head cast out again. Then two missed bullhuss. One felt heavy for a few seconds then came off, the squid/mackerel bait had slipped down and choked the hook. The other was an unusually pale-coloured fish for the area that spat out the hook at the edge, good size too. Finally a good run on a mackerel head and this one stayed on ...

 

 

... 9.5lbs it weighed. Next cast another good run but the fish had gone to ground, after five minutes of pulling from different angles it came off and I was lucky to get my tackle back. Next cast this one of 9lbs on squid/mackerel ...

The bite-a-chuck action on the big baits continued, and after missing one I finished the session with two more bullhuss both a good deal smaller than those above.

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Tue

19

Apr

2016

Slow at Rosscarbery

The east wind didn't seem to be blowing more than a gentle breeze yet, maybe time for one more session before it really kicked in ... I headed down to Rosscarbery.

 

Straightaway on arriving I knew it was going to be a struggle ... a fresh and cold SE wind blowing up the estuary, bright sunshine and the water the clearest and lowest in the pool that I'd seen this year. How low? About thigh deep for a heron ...

Still I could see mullet moving around in the shallows, though the ones close in seemed exceptionally spooky. I decided legering at range would be the best option, with the usual pop-up crust bait that had done so well over my last few trips here.

 

Two hours later and I'd not had a twitch on either tip. Two guys fishing further up the pool, also legering, also seemed to be blanking. Then a drop back on the right hand tip which may have just been the lead shifting in the crosswind ... but I struck and found myself connected to a mullet ... not a particularly large one but as it came off half way in so I'll never know the exact size.

 

I cast out again hoping I wouldn't have another two hours to wait for the next bite. After about ten minutes the left hand tip pulled over, and this fish stayed attached. Only 2lb 9oz but a pristine little fish and a lot better than the blank that seemed to be looming ...

Soon after the new tide arrived in the pool and the mullet I was seeing just melted away. I assume at this time of the year the sea water is colder than the water in the pool and the temperature shock puts them down ... later in the year the flood of new oxygenated water into the pool often stimulates a feeding spell.

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Mon

18

Apr

2016

Well you don't see that every day ...

There were strong east winds forecast for the rest of the week after today, so I was keen to get out. I chose a deep water rock mark over the hill on the Bantry Bay side of the peninsula. I set up with two big baits - mackerel heads and squid/mackerel cocktails.

It was a grey old day and quiet choppy, and it proved desperately slow for the first couple of hours. When I lost one set of tackle in a snag I replaced it with a two hook paternoster with size 2 Aberdeen hooks and mackerel strip baits, to see if there were any smaller fish about.

 

Everything remained quiet.

 

Finally a rattle on the big bait rod ... then a couple of feet of line dragged off. I struck and contacted the fish, and quickly had this strap conger up on the rocks.

 

After unhooking it and returning it, I was starting baiting up again when I noticed the line on the paternoster rod had gone all slack.

 

I wound down and struck into a heavy weight. It felt much better than the strap I'd just returned, and here's what came up to the surface ...

Well you don't see that every day! A double shot of congers, fortunately I suppose both only straps about 5lbs each.

 

I managed to slide them out onto the rocks. Remarkably neither had bitten through the 20lb nylon traces, or bent out the Aberdeen hooks - though the hooks would never be quite the same again.

 

The tide was dropping quite quickly now, so I didn't bother setting up the paternoster again. I fished on with just the one big bait, and after a couple of missed bites finished the session with a small bull huss.

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Sun

17

Apr

2016

Birthday Mullet

Back from our trip to the UK and my birthday today. I really wanted a birthday mullet, a feat I've only managed a couple of times over the years back in Hampshire. So I headed back towards the estuary that had been producing so well before our trip away.

 

A few minutes fishing was enough to tell me the number of mullet in the pool had reduced significantly over the past fortnight, and on this very neap tide there was no chance of any more arriving on the high water a couple of hours hence. So I fished patiently hoping for a chance with whatever mullet were left trapped in the pool.

 

After the thick end of an hour, my float bobbed then slid away, and I struck into a mullet. It put up a decent fight but obviously wasn't a massive fish, and after a few minutes this thicklip of 3lbs exactly was in the net ...

After this everything went very quiet for another hour or more, then I started getting regular bites all from the left hand end of my swim. They weren't strong bites, just barely sometimes getting the float under before it popped back up. I missed loads of them before hooking a mullet of about a pound in one of its ventral fins! A few minutes later I had another one of similar size this time fairly hooked. 

 

I decided not to grind on for what looked like little reward, instead I headed back towards home and stopped to look at some shallow swims near the head of Dunmanus Bay at Durrus. We'd seen some mullet along there as we drove back onto the peninsula after our trip away  - the first this year spotted in the Bay - but today there was no sunshine and a stronger ripple. I waded and fished for an hour but only saw one swirl that may or may not have been a mullet.

 

Still, birthday mullet achieved, very happy.

 

 

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Sun

03

Apr

2016

Back on the Rocks

I fished a rock mark on the north side of the Sheep's Head today. It was in the main a rather quiet session ... somehow the ground fishing hasn't quite kicked off this year yet. However there was a little flurry of activity in the run-up to high water with a few knocks and pulls and a fish (almost certainly a bull huss) that let go part way in. Finally this one, possibly the same one, was landed after taking a popped-up squid and mackerel cocktail. It was nothing special in size, about 6lbs to 7lbs, but I was pleased to have avoided a blank with a decent fish. We have some time away back in the UK coming up, I'm hoping the rock fishing will get going in my absence.

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Thu

31

Mar

2016

Bass ... Nah, Mullet

Today I intended to dig some lug then go fish for bass on a surf beach on the Mizen peninsula. However as this took me close to the estuary where I caught mullet on Tuesday, and as my mullet gear was still in the car, I thought I'd head out a bit early and get in a couple of hours of mulleting before going to dig at low water.

 

I set up in the swim where I'd finished on Tuesday. The conditions were very different - gentle SW breeze and wall-to-wall sunshine - but the mullet were still at home.

 

I had the first bite on my second cast, and my first fish on the bank after about fifteen minutes, 3lb 14oz. Then a sort of pattern set up with bites stopped till the mullet gradually came back onto the feed, another fish and repeat ... the non-feeding spell getting longer each time. Five more mullet followed of 3:12, 3:07, 3:10, 3:05 and 2:10 ... I fished on another hour without a bite so decided that was that.

 

Somehow I'd fished right through the low water period, I'm sure I could have still got a few worms if I'd rushed off but I was happy with what I'd had and there didn't seem much point in rushing. The lugworms, and bass, could wait for another day.

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Tue

29

Mar

2016

Change of Venue

I fished a shallow estuary south and west of us today, one that had fished well when we'd been over on holiday in April 2014 and 2015. I'd had a look a couple of weeks ago but not seen any fish, and I wondered if I was still too early today ... it looked windswept and bleak on arrival.

 

I felt mildly encouraged to find a pile of scales on the bank ... looked like an otter had had some luck with the mullet anyway. I set up in a swim that offered a little shelter, but the first few times the float trotted through uninterrupted.

 

Then I started to get stabby little bites. They were impossible to hit but eventually one held under slightly longer and I connected. After a short scrap this pretty little 1:10 thick lip was netted; it had been hooked in the outside of the lip.

The swim was quiet for a few minutes after that, then a hail squall passed over. The best I could do fishing-wise with hood up and head down was to dangle just off the rod tip in the fizzing water ... where I promptly missed two sail-away bites!

 

I couldn't get another take there as the hail eased off, so I started trotting through normally again. All was quiet for half an hour or so until I had a good bite completely out of the blue ... and struck into a very solid feeling fish.

 

The mullet ran out strongly then kited round to my left and spent a good deal of time trying bury itself in the reeds. Eventually it swam out again and I was able to gradually work it near enough to net.

 

It weighed 4lb 12oz, one of the biggest I've had from this venue.

My swim seemed well and truly dead after the fight, so I relocated 50 yards or so to my left to a small gap in the reeds. 

 

After feeding for ten minutes or so I started getting bites, and landed a 2:12 with a recent but healing wound on its flank, possibly a lucky escape from one of the otters. 45 minutes later, another flurry of bites resulted in a 4:03 ... as I was putting the camera away I noticed a smear of (presumably) mullet slime across the lens. Sorry the photos of the last two fish were not really usable.

 

The swim went really quiet after this, at 5.00 pm I decided I'd give it a last hour in case the mullet came back.

 

Another heavy squall came through. This should have been lucky ...

... but the float continued to trot through time after time.

 

At 5.59 and 30 seconds, the float plunged under. I missed the bite (of course) but now I just had to stay on.

 

Suddenly it was a bite a cast, but could I hit them? I strongly suspected it was small fish like the first one, but when I finally connected after about ten minutes and as many bites, the Preston hooped over.

 

Great scrap and this 3:14 to finish.

 

 

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Fri

25

Mar

2016

More Mullets

I had a blank session from the rocks midweek so decided on another trip down to Rosscarbery on Good Friday.

 

There were visibly less mullet this time in the shallows where I'd fished before, but I could still see a few moving around with trademark bow waves and swirls.

 

I put out two leger rods with pop-up crust baits like last time, and soon had a good take on the right-hand line. The fight was dogged but unspectacular, and after a few minutes I was able to reach down from the wall to net this one of 4lb 4oz.

 

On starting again there were now very few fish at all showing but I fished on more in hope than expectation while I ate lunch. All was quiet on the tips but just after I'd finished eating the left- hand tip pulled over.

 

It was obviously not a big fish but after a game scrap I landed my smallest mullet of the winter to date, this pretty 2:10 ...

 

 

After this it really did look hopeless in that swim so I decided to have a walk round to try to find some mullet.

 

The stiff and none-too-warm breeze was blowing right into the corner by the hotel at the top of the pool. The water was quite rough but periodically I could see big whelms as mullet were spooked by birds passing over them. 

 

I relocated the car, put up the tailgate and fished from the relative shelter just behind.

 

The tips were buffeted around by the wind and it was difficult to keep a tight line to the leads. After 30 minutes without a bite (as far as I could tell) I was just coming to the conclusion these fish weren't feeding when the left-hand tip knocked and the line fell slack. I struck and missed but a decent mullet turned over ... I couldn't be sure if it had been on the bait or had just swum into the line.

 

Next cast the same rod pulled round much more decisively and I was in. This one put up a great scrap with several powerful short runs and long spells of dogged resistance ... 4lb 13oz.

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Sun

20

Mar

2016

Five at Rosscarbery